Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-ix

Female genital excision is undoubtedly one of the most heavily and widely debated cultural traditions of our time. Although the ritual practice is most prevalent in Africa,1 the voices of Africans contributing to the international debate on female genital excision tend to be drowned out by the outraged reactions of...

Analyzed Works

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction: Writing Women’s Rites and Rights

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pp. 3-26

In the creation story of the Dogon of Mali, Amma, the male god of creation, tries to penetrate the female Earth he has just created. His attempt is thwarted by the Earth’s potent clitoris, which, in the shape of a termite hill, rises against Amma to prevent the rape. The almighty Creator, however, works his will and...

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Chapter 1: Denunciations of Colonization and Hesitant Feminist Criticism in Early Literary “Circumscriptions” of Female Genital Excision (1963–1974)

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pp. 27-75

Female genital excision first appears in African creative writing in the mid- 1960s, when young African authors were generating a breakthrough for African literatures in European languages.1 Among those widely recognized for their trailblazing roles are the Kenyan Ngugi wa Thiong’o and the Nigerian Flora...

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Chapter 2: Growing Feminist Disenchantment in Literary Explorations of Female Genital Excision around the UN Decade for Women

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pp. 76-150

Within a couple of years of the publication of the first African literary texts dealing with female genital excision, the practice and its traditional significance come to be addressed more candidly by a second generation of...

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Chapter 3: The Globalization of the Literary Debate on Female Genital Excision at the Close of the Twentieth Century (1982–1998)

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pp. 151-195

The end of the United Nations Women’s Decade in 1985 did not signal the demise of the debate on female genital excision any more than it diminished the literary interest in the practice. Stimulated by the globalization of the debate in the final decades of the twentieth century, a whole new range of authors...

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Conclusion

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pp. 196-202

Since 1963, when Rebeka Njau first dealt with female genital excision in her play The Scar, the practice has been consistently explored in creative writing from the African continent, and since the 1980s in African diaspora writing as well. In Rising Anthills I have shown how a score of literary authors, men and women from various parts of the African continent and its diaspora, writing in English...

Notes

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pp. 203-230

References

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pp. 231-248

Index

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pp. 249-262