Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Illustrations

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p. ix

Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiii

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Series Editors' Introduction

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p. xv

In Epidemics and Enslavement: Biological Catastrophe in the Native Southeast, 1492-1715, Paul Kelton addresses important issues in the historiography of Native America: how do we explain the apparently dramatic population decline of...

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Introduction

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pp. xvii-xxii

Since the 1970s, Alfred Crosby's Columbian Exchange concept has made biology central to understanding European success in conquering the Americas. European colonization, Crosby emphasized, included much more than just people...

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Chapter One: Disease Ecology of the Native Southeast, 1000-1492

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pp. 1-46

In 1492, the indigenous peoples of the Americas lacked experience with many of the nasty germs that had plagued Europeans, a fact that has led to both scholarly and popular characterizations of Native populations as "virgin soil." But despite...

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Chapter Two: The Protohistoric Puzzle, 1492-1659

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pp. 47-100

"But again, it as other times pleased Almighty God to send unusual Sicknesses amongst [the Indians], as the Smallpox, . . . to lessen their numbers; so that the English in Comparison to the Spaniard, have but little Indian Blood to answer...

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Chatper Three: Slave Raids and Smallpox, 1659-1700

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pp. 101-159

When Nicholas Carteret and his party of settlers first approached the shores of South Carolina in 1670, they found indigenous peoples welcoming. As the party sailed near Port Royal, Carteret reported,Natives "ran up to the middle in...

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Chapter Four: The Epidemiological Origins of the Yamasee War, 1700-1715

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pp. 160-220

In September 1713 and again in September 1714, two successive hurricanes battered the Carolina coast. Amid the devastation an Anglican minister, Benjamin Dennis, came to believe that "if another happen[ed] [that] year the inhabitants...

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Chapter Five: Conclusion

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pp. 221-224

It is often said that historians do not like to talk about epidemics because of their supposed accidental nature.1 Epidemics after all seem out of human control, whereas other historical events such as wars and revolutions can be seen as the...

Notes

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pp. 225-261

Bibliography

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pp. 263-277

Index

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pp. 279-288