In this Book

Remember This!
summary
Situating Dakota language and oral tradition within the framework of decolonization, Remember This! Dakota Decolonization and the Eli Taylor Narratives makes a radical departure from other works in Indigenous history because it relies solely on Indigenous oral tradition for its primary sources and privileges Dakota language in the text.
 
Waziyatawin Angela Wilson, both a historian and a member of the Dakota Nation, demonstrates the value of oral history in this bilingual presentation and skillful analysis of the stories told by the Dakota elder Eli Taylor (1908–99). Taylor lived on the Sioux Valley Reserve in Manitoba, Canada, and was adopted into Wilson’s family in 1988. He agreed to tell her his story and to share his accounts of the origins, history, and life ways of the Dakotas. In these pages he tells of Dakota history, the United States–Dakota Conflict of 1862, Dakota values, and the mysterious powers of the world. Wilson gracefully contextualizes and complements Taylor's stories with a careful analysis and distillation of the narratives. Additionally, she provides an overview of Dakota history and a substantial critique of the use of oral accounts by mainstream historians.
 
By placing Dakota oral tradition within the academic discipline of history, this powerful book illuminates the essential connections among Dakota language, history, and contemporary identity.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Frontmatter
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Illustrations
  2. p. viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction: Daunkotapi! (We Are Dakota!)
  2. pp. 1-22
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. Okiciyaka Unyanpi (Oral Tradition)
  2. pp. 23-36
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Owotanna Wohdakapo (Tell It Straight)
  2. pp. 37-50
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. De Iapi Unk';upi (We Were Given This Language)
  2. pp. 51-67
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Dena Nah'un Waun (These I Heard Growing Up)
  2. pp. 68-91
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Taku Ociciyake Wacin (I Want to Tell You Something)
  2. pp. 92-101
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Toked Imacage (How I Grew Up)
  2. pp. 102-125
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Dakotak Hena Wicawada (I Believe in Those Dakota Ways)
  2. pp. 126-136
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Wahokunkiyapi (They Provide Guidance)
  2. pp. 141-168
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Taku Wakan (That Which Is Mysterious)
  2. pp. 169-183
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. Akicitapi (They Are Warriors)
  2. pp. 184-196
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. Wicotawacin Yuwaste (It Makes for Good Thoughts)
  2. pp. 197-203
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. Toked Kapi Oyakapi (Commentary)
  2. pp. 204-220
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Taku Toktokca Iwohdakapi (A Discussion of Different Things)
  2. pp. 221-235
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Conclusion: Oyate Nipi Kte (The People Shall Live)
  2. pp. 236-241
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix A: Explanation of Dakota Orthography
  2. pp. 243-245
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix B: Upper Sioux Community Resolution
  2. pp. 246-247
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 249-261
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 263-269
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Source Acknowledgments
  2. p. 271
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 273-277
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.