Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. 1-7

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 8-11

This project has a long and complicated history. From 2002 through 2004,I was part of a research team at the Campaign Finance Institute that wasexploring the effect of campaign ‹nance reform on organized interests. Ihad the privilege of being in Washington, within a few blocks of all ofthese groups’ headquarters, as they were planning their strategies for the...

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Author’s Note

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pp. 12-13

One of the perils of writing an academic work about contemporary poli-tics is the risk that a book starts to become out of date the moment it ap-pears in print. In both the United States and Canada, campaign ‹nancelaw is very much in turmoil. Canada’s prorogation crisis of late 2008added an unexpected twist late in the writing of this book, and the U.S....

List of Acronyms

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pp. 14-15

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Introduction: Interest Groups and Campaign Finance Reform—A Natural Experiment

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pp. 16-37

...“What’s most important is that we elect a president with the provenability to bring Democrats and Republicans together to get results so“Maybe I’ve just lived a little too long, but I have no illusions abouthow hard this is going to be. You are not going to wave a magic wand“I understand who I work for. I don’t work for a party. I don’t work...

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I. The Roots of Reform

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pp. 38-97

Within many sub‹elds of political science, it has been possible to makeadvances in our knowledge of political institutions and behavior withoutplacing the United States in a pivotal role. For example, many of the clas-sic works on political parties, such as those of Duverger or Michels, havemade enduring contributions to our knowledge of political parties as a...

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II. Consequences of Reform

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pp. 98-227

Campaign ‹nance reform in both the United States and Canada had sev-eral immediate effects. As the two nations’ laws intended, corporate andlabor spending played less of a role in the immediate postreform electionsthan had previously been the case. Changes in individual contributionlimits also ensured that individuals played a much larger role in funding...

Appendix: A Primer on Brokerage Parties

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pp. 228-231

Notes

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pp. 232-239

List of Interviews

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pp. 240-241

Bibliography

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pp. 242-257

Index

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pp. 258-276