Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Producing an anthology is a testimonio created with the ayuda of a thousand spirits. As editors on this journey, we witness a series of collaborations—some new, others of long standing. Therefore, we would like to thank our contributors and each other for the countless long-distance phone calls, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Since the 1992 republication of The Squatter and the Don (1885), María Amparo Ruiz de Burton has become a key figure in the recovery of nineteenth-century Mexican American literature specifically and the reconfiguration of nineteenth-century American literary culture more generally. ...

Part 1: Locating Ruiz de Burton in the Nineteenth Century

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Returning California to the People: Vigilantism in The Squatter and the Don

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pp. 11-26

As the epigraph above suggests, this essay understands María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s second novel, The Squatter and the Don (1885), as directly responding to the role that vigilantism played in post–Civil War politics and social debates in southern California. Crucial to this argument is Ruiz de Burton’s ...

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Remember the Hacienda: Land and Community in Californio Narratives

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pp. 27-55

As members of the nineteenth-century Mexican Californian rancher class, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton and Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo acquired tracts of land originally ceded as mission grants in the pre-1848 era. Each also produced a literary narrative intended to address the land question as it had developed in the strikingly different ...

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The Symptoms of Conquest: Race, Class, and the Nervous Body in The Squatter and the Don

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pp. 56-72

In the second half of the nineteenth century, physicians, railroad magnates, and real estate developers promoted the conquest and settlement of Alta California by declaring the region a health resort. Its climate and natural features, they maintained, would cure and reinvigorate even the weakest and most jaded city-dweller. ...

Part 2: Reading Race and Nation in Who Would Have Thought It?

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Beasts in the Jungle: Foreigners and Natives in Boston

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pp. 75-94

I was halfway between Cheyenne and Laramie driving east on I-80 when I saw the sign for “Little America.” I remember Wyoming from the summer my family spent on a dude ranch near Jackson Hole when I was nine. Together with my brothers and sister, I rode slow ponies around a corral and wore out a pair of heavy-heeled ...

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Thank God, Lolita is Away from Those Horrid Savages: The Politics of Whiteness in Who Would Have Thought It?

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pp. 95-111

As with most historical romances, Who Would Have Thought It? has its share of contrived plots, melodramatic moments, stock characters, and crucial misunderstandings that help and hinder the narrative’s national nuptials. First, the novel recounts the coming of age of Lola Medina, a wealthy Mexican American ...

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Captive Identities: The Gendered Conquest of Mexico in Who Would Have Thought It?

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pp. 112-132

Within the first pages of María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s Who Would Have Thought It?(1872), New Englander Dr. Norval describes his 1857 rescue of a Mexican child, Lola Medina. She was born in captivity in the Colorado River region after her mother had been kidnapped from her home on a hacienda in Sonora, Mexico, ...

Part 3: Critiquing the Conquest of California

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A Europeanized New World: Colonialism and Cosmopolitanism in Who Would Have Thought It?

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pp. 135-152

María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s 1872 novel Who Would Have Thought It? poses a problem for recent critical efforts to decenter Anglo American literature. These efforts have included Lawrence Buell’s idea to “refashion American studies as a hemispheric project” (479), which Janice Radway has proposed ...

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The Whiteness of the Blush: The Cultural Politics of Racial Formation in The Squatter and the Don

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pp. 153-168

The historical romance makes nations in making families, but in María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s 1885 novel The Squatter and the Don, the romantic dream of national unity is dispelled by another allegory that ominously promises the disappearance of family and nation altogether. ...

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Rescuing the Past: The Case of Olive Oatman and Lola Medina

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pp. 169-184

Upon the narrative of Olive Oatman, an Anglo American captive whose return to Victorian society hinged on repeated renunciation of miscegenation, desires to return to Mohave society, and the indelible mark of a chin tattoo, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton grafts a tale of a Mexicana whose moral and class standards ...

Part 4: Discovering Ruiz de Burton’s Theatrical Vision

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Precarious Performances: Ruiz de Burton’s Theatrical Vision of the Gilded Age Female Consumer

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pp. 187-205

Soon after the publication of Who Would Have Thought It? by J. B. Lippincott, a favorable review appeared in Lippincott’s Magazine. Given their shared publisher, the magazine’s endorsement of the novel is not in itself remarkable. Instead, the significance of this anonymous review lies in its classification of the novel ...

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Mine Is the Mission of Redress: The New Order of Knight-Errantry in Don Quixote de la Mancha: A Comedy in Five Acts

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pp. 206-224

One of María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s objectives in rewriting Miguel de Cervantes’s novel into a play concerns a reclaiming of her cultural and literary heritage on California lands—an impossible task by 1876. As the epigraphs reveal, Ruiz de Burton’s negotiation of land and livelihood on American soil (once Mexican) ...

Part 5: Teaching Ruiz de Burton

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Strategies for the Classroom

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pp. 227-244

John González: One task is to encourage students to think about the linkages between race, gender, and class for the Californios, as a former colonial elite, within the new context of post-Reconstruction white supremacy. Additionally, there is the metacritical aspect of teaching this novel: ...

Chronology of Events in the Life of Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton

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pp. 245-246

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Ruiz de Burton's Litigation Correspondence and Letters

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pp. 247-252

The following three letters—dated 15 February 1869, 12 August 1869, and 21 July 1871—all correlate to one or more of the essays in this volume. They were originally written in Spanish and have been translated below. The translation seeks to be true to the original letter; ...

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The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

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pp. 253-254

Mexicans now established in territories previously belonging to Mexico, and which remain for the future within the limits of the United States, as defined by the present Treaty, shall be free to continue where they now reside, or to remove at any time to the Mexican Republic, ...

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Letter from Henry Wagner Halleck to Pablo de la Guerra on California Land Commissioners’ Decisions to Confirm Lands

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pp. 255-256

The commissioners to-day gave some more decisions confirming several claims and rejecting a number of others. Among these confirmed is the claim of Marin Antonia to “Corral de Cerote.” This I hardly expected, for under the former decisions I really expected that this would be rejected. ...

Teaching Resource Bibliography

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pp. 257-270

Works Cited

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pp. 271-286

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Contributors

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pp. 287-290

Jesse Alemán is assistant professor of English at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches nineteenth-century American and Chicano/a literatures. His articles appear in Melus, Recovering the U.S. Hispanic Literary Heritage Project, vol. 3 (Arte Público Press), Aztlán, and several edited book collections. ...

Index

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pp. 291-303