In this Book

Reassessing Revitalization Movements
summary
The escalating political, economic, and cultural colonization of indigenous peoples over the past few centuries has spawned a multitude of revitalization movements. These movements promise liberation from domination by outsiders and incorporate and rework elements of traditional culture. Reassessing Revitalization Movements is the first book to discuss and compare in detail the origins, structure, and development of religious and political revitalization movements in North America and the Pacific Islands (known as Oceania). The essays cover the twentieth-century Cargo Cults of the South Pacific, the 1870 and 1890 Ghost Dance movements in western North America, the Tuka Movement on Fiji in 1885, as well as the revitalistic aspects of contemporary social movements in North American and Oceania.

Reassessing Revitalization Movements takes Anthony F. C. Wallace’s concept of revitalization movements and examines the applicability of the model to a variety of religious and anticolonial movements in North America and the Pacific Islands. This extension of the revitalization movement model beyond its traditional territory in Native anthropology enriches our understanding of movements outside of North America and offers a holistic view of them that embraces phenomena ranging from the psychic to the ecological. This cross-cultural approach provides the most stimulating and broadly applicable treatment of the topic in decades.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-xii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction: Revitalization as History and Theory
  2. pp. xv-xxxvi
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  1. Chapter 1. Indian Revolts and Cargo Cults: Ritual Violence and Revitalization in California and New Guinea
  2. pp. 1-61
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  1. Chapter 2 Visions of Revitalization in the Eastern Woodlands: Can a Middle-Aged theory Stretch to Embrace the First Cherokee Converts?
  2. pp. 61-87
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  1. Chapter 3. Priests and Prophets: The Politics of Voice in the Pacific
  2. pp. 88-103
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  1. Chapter 4. The Wasitay Religion: Prophecy, Oral Literacy, and Belief on Hudson Bay
  2. pp. 104-123
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  1. Chapter 5. Revitalization in Wartime Micronesia
  2. pp. 124-142
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  1. Chapter 6. Revitalization as Catharsis: The Warm House Cult of Western Oregon
  2. pp. 143-161
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  1. Chapter 7. The Evolution of Revitalization Movements Among the Yangoru Boiken, Papua New Guinea
  2. pp. 162-182
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  1. Chapter 8. Recontextualizing Revitalization: Cosmology and Cultural Stability in the Adoption of Peyotism Among the Yuchi
  2. pp. 183-205
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  1. Chapter 9. New Life for Whom?: The Scope of the Trope in Marshall Islands Kürijmõj
  2. pp. 206-224
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  1. Chapter 10. Ogitchida at Waswaaganing: Conflict in the Revitalization of Lac du Flambeau Anishinaabe Identiry
  2. pp. 225-246
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  1. Chapter 11. Expressions of Identity in Tahiti
  2. pp. 247-260
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  1. Chapter 12. "Canny About Conflict": Nativism, Revitalization, and the Invention of Tradition in Native Southeastern New England
  2. pp. 261-278
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  1. References Cited
  2. pp. 279-328
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 329-332
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 333-341
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