Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. viii

Maps

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Series Editors' Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

"Americans remain fascinated by the Civil War. Movies, television, and video-even computer software-have augmented the ever-expanding list of books on the war. Although it stands to reason that a large portion of recent work concentrates on military aspects of the conflict, historians..."

read more

Chapter 1

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

"Long before cannon thundered at Fort Sumter, Americans North and South recognized the economic importance of the Mississippi River and its tributaries in the sprawling region west of the Appalachian Mountains. The vast river system provided farmers and merchants in more than a..."

read more

Chapter 2

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-32

"Vicksburg, aptly nicknamed the Hill City, sprawls up a series of terraces from the river's edge to the top of a line of bluffs over two hundred feet high. In 1862 at least forty-six hundred people, of whom perhaps fourteen hundred were slaves, lived in Vicksburg-on-the-hill...."

read more

Chapter 3

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-45

"In the North events were gathering speed. President Lincoln appointed Henry Halleck general in chief of the Union army in July 1862. Before leaving for the East Halleck divided his department, placing Maj. Gen. Ulysses Grant in command of the District of West Tennessee on the..."

read more

Chapter 4

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-59

"Sherman's expedition pulled away from Memphis on December 20, 1862. 'Just leaving the city & streched out before me is one of the grandest spectakles to be seen,' stated William Winters of the Sixtyseventh Indiana. Up and down the Mississippi River, as far as the young..."

read more

Chapter 5

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 60-75

"The Army of the Tennessee returned to Vicksburg at the end of January 1863. McClernand's and Sherman's corps disembarked at Young's Point, Milliken's Bend, and other locations on the west bank of the Mississippi above De Soto Point; McPherson's corps landed farther upstream..."

read more

Chapter 6

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-89

"Shortly after he approved McClernand's proposal to raise an army and lead it against Vicksburg, Lincoln selected Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks to replace Benjamin Butler as commander of the Department of the Gulf. Banks was a former Speaker of the House of Representatives and a..."

read more

Chapter 7

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 90-105

"During the night of March 28,1863, thunderstorms raised havoc in the Union camps and anchorages opposite Vicksburg. Perhaps the spectacular display of nature's might cleared Grant's head, for the next morning he made the fateful decision that left Banks high and dry at Alexandria..."

read more

Chapter 8

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 106-116

"If only Matthew Brady or one of the many talented combat artists of the Civil War such as Edwin Forbes or Alfred Waud had been present on April 30, 1863, they would have captured for posterity one of the most sublime moments in American military history as the Army of the Tennessee crossed the Mississippi River.With paddlewheels churning the..."

read more

Chapter 9

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-126

"Grant moved quickly and boldly to exploit his initial success. Since leaving Memphis four months earlier, he had been under strict orders from Halleck to cooperate with Nathaniel Banks in Louisiana. While mired in the mud oppositeVicksburg, Grant had developed plans either to float McPherson's corps from Lake Providence to the Red River or to march..."

read more

Chapter 10

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 127-139

"During the two weeks that followed Grant's crossing of the Mississippi River, Pemberton evacuated Grenada and Fort Pemberton as well as Grand Gulf and enlarged the stockpiles of food and ammunition inside the Vicksburg defenses. But while preparing for the worst, he was not yet..."

read more

Chapter 11

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 140-152

"The heavy boom of artillery echoed among the streets of Vicksburg on May 16 as the armies clashed at Champion Hill. The ominous rumbling alarmed the citizens of the Hill City as they realized for the first time the proximity of the danger on land.The sound of battle grew louder the...."

read more

Chapter 12

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-160

"The failure of the costly assaults of May 19 and 22 convinced Grant that the Confederate defenses could not be taken by storm, at least not yet. To avoid another bloodbath he decided to 'outcamp the enemy,' as he termed it, by laying siege to Vicksburg."

read more

Chapter 13

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-169

"As the noose around Vicksburg tightened, citizens and soldiers alike found themselves trapped in a quest for survival. For many in the beleaguered city, life under siege soon translated into life underground. Those who could fled to caves dug deep into the hills to escape the constant bombardment of Union guns and mortars that rained iron down upon the city."

read more

Chapter 14

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 170-178

"As June faded into July, the siege of Vicksburg entered its seventh week. Pemberton and his soldiers despaired of rescue, and a feeling of gloom hung over the army much as a thick shroud. Union saps had reached the outer ditch at several points along the eight-mile line of crumbling..."

read more

Chapter 15

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-186

"Glory hallelujah!' declared William Sherman when he learned that John Pemberton had agreed to surrender. 'The best Fourth of July since 1776.' Both Grant and Sherman desired to press the advantage and immediately turned their attention toward Joseph Johnston, whose so-called Army of..."

read more

Chapter 16

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-204

"While the struggle for Vicksburg was taking place, an equally intense contest was underway one hundred miles to the south at Port Hudson. On May 7, 1863, Nathaniel Banks and two divisions of the Army of the Gulf marched into Alexandria after a whirlwind offensive through southcentral Louisiana that sent Richard Taylor and Edmund Kirby Smith..."

read more

Epilogue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-212

"The struggle for the Mississippi River was the longest and most complex campaign, or series of campaigns, of the Civil War. It was marked by an extraordinary diversity of military operations, including naval engagements, cavalry raids, amphibious landings, pitched battles, and the two..."

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-220

Bibliographical Essay

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-222

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-233