Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Illustrations

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p. viii

List of Maps

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pp. ix-x

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Series Editors' Introduction

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pp. xi-xii

"Americans remain fascinated by the Civil War. Movies, television, and video-even computer software-have augmented the ever-expanding list of books on the war. Although it stands to reason that a large portion of recent work concentrates on military aspects of the conflict, historians..."

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xii-xiv

"This book was conceived by the editors of Great Campaigns of the Civil War, Anne J. Bailey and Brooks Simpson, and I am grateful to them for inviting me to contribute this volume to the series. While on a Fulbright fellowship in the Netherlands, Brooks took the time to share his thoughts..."

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xxiv

"In 1861 Harvard-educated Manning Ferguson Force suspended a promising legal career in Ohio to serve in the Union army. Although a native ofWashington DC, his experience as a soldier began in September 1861 as a major in the Twentieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, eventually rising to..."

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1. Rivers,Valleys, and Armies

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pp. 1-26

"It was one of the weaknesses of the Confederacy in theWest,' wrote Allan Nevins in his seminal work The War for the Union, 'that the two rivers, the Tennessee and Cumberland, reached inland from the North toward its center. . . .A mere glance at the map would seem to reveal that the..."

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2. Politics, Planning, and Procrastination

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pp. 27-52

"Although the military inertia of the winter carried over into the new year of 1862, the war had entered a new phase for the Federals.Their defeat at Bull Run and the Balls Bluff fiasco in mid-October 1861 disgusted Union legislators, particularly the Radical Republicans, who waited anxiously..."

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3. Henry and Donelson

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pp. 53-84

"As obvious as the weakness of the Confederate line was to Federal authorities, so too was the unmistakable sign to the Confederates that the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers flooded every winter. In past years this was a time of great advantage for farmers seeking to use water transports..."

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4. Missed Opportunities

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pp. 85-112

"If anyone was regretful during the bleak winter days following the fall of Fort Donelson, it was Albert Sidney Johnston. Most of the nearly seventeen thousand inhabitants of Nashville had initially welcomed his army euphorically to the city having read in the local paper of Brig. Gen. John..."

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5. Toward Pittsburg Landing

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pp. 113-138

"By mid-March, as Johnston and Beauregard debated the logistics of gathering their armies, Charles F. Smith was preparing for the upcoming Tennessee River expedition, an operation eagerly awaited by the troops who were 'anxious to fight if we have a show,' asserted one Illinoisan."

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6. Bloody Shiloh

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pp. 139-165

"Almost sixty years after the battle of Shiloh, Joseph Ruff, a German veteran of the Twelfth Michigan, remembered that the night of April 5 was warm and the 'stars were shining.' As nearly as he could judge, it was about 3 A.M. when Maj. James Powell's three companies patrolled the vicinity south of the church. As the soldiers passed through Seay Field..."

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7. A Siege from Beginning to Close

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pp. 166-186

"OnFriday, April 11, a group of Federal officers walked down to the landing where just days before sheer pandemonium reigned as thousands of panicstricken soldiers cowered under the bluffs during the fighting. All was calm now and a steamer was approaching. It pulled up to the landing and..."

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8. The Promise of Summer

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pp. 187-206

"If Beauregard had not actually thrown away the war in the West as he was criticized for doing, the loss of Corinth undeniably diminished his credibility as a commander. Many Southerners came to believe he was responsible for the recent setbacks, and most certainly in Jefferson..."

Notes

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pp. 207-240

Bibliographical Essay

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pp. 241-246

Index

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pp. 247-253