Cover

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

The American novelist Sherwood Anderson once remarked, "The whole glory of writing lies in the fact that it forces us out of ourselves and into the lives of others." In my case, at least, the truth of this sentiment is probably more than Anderson intended. While over the last several years my writing has brought me into...

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INTRODUCTION: Washington for Jesus

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pp. 1-23

The crowds began to assemble early, some arriving on busses, a line of which remained parked on the streets nearby. Others took the Metro, Washington's new subway system, chartered during the morning rush hour for the occasion. Despite the gray and chilly weather, the thousands arriving remained enthusiastic, congregating...

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ONE: The Times They Are a-Changin'

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pp. 25-60

James Earl Carter Jr.'s love of family was no charade, and his frequent professions of faith were no political ploy. Faith and family formed the foundation of Carter's life, the key to his character, and the explanation for many of his actions. From his birth in 1924 in the small southern town of Plains, Georgia, Carter inherited...

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TWO: The Year of the Evangelical [Includes Image Plates]

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pp. 61-106

If Jimmy Carter hoped to prove himself a different sort of president, a man above narrow electoral self- interest, he first had to win the Oval Office. His 1976 campaign staff, which included experienced political advisors and fellow Georgians Hamilton Jordan and Jody Powell, had no naïveté about what this involved. They well knew that...

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THREE: Rootin' and Tootin'

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pp. 107-153

The inauguration of Jimmy Carter on January 20, 1977, spoke volumes about how he envisioned himself and anticipated his presidency. He was not like those who came before, it suggested; he was truly a man of the people. Wearing a normal business suit that he had purchased in a small Georgia town, Carter abstained...

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FOUR: His Faith and Virtue Were Not Enough

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pp. 155-201

At the end of 1977 Carter expressed frustration that so many Americans doubted his leadership and that issues of competence bedeviled his administration. Twelve months earlier he had ridden a wave of optimism, but now polls indicated that a significant percentage of citizens questioned if he were up to the challenge. His...

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FIVE: The Formidable Conservative Barrage

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pp. 203-244

"Every hero becomes at last a bore," observed Ralph Waldo Emerson. By early 1979 little doubt remained among the odd coalition that had elected Jimmy Carter three years before. Carter was more than a bore; he was a nuisance, his presidency a failure undeserving of another term in office. From the political Left , the outspoken...

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SIX: The Profamily Movement

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pp. 245-273

The new decade of the 1980s begged for a strong leader. With inflation ravaging the economy and America disrespected abroad, voters sought a presidential candidate strong enough to order the chaos. Despite the obvious obstacles of his first term, a seemingly rejuvenated Carter was determined to take charge of the crisis...

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SEVEN: The Reagan Revolution

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pp. 275-319

Only days after the white house Conference on Families concluded in Los Angeles, half a continent away the Republicans convened for their national convention. Held at Detroit's Joe Louis Arena from July 14 to 17, 1980, the convention demonstrated just how far the party and its charismatic candidate, Ronald Reagan, had united...

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EPILOGUE: A Fault Line in American Society

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pp. 321-349

In Paradise Lost John Milton wrote, "The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, and a Hell of Heaven."1 Departing the White House on January 20, 1981, Reagan's inauguration day, it appeared the fifty-six-year-old Carter was a broken man, banished, as it were, to Hades. The Religious Right, meanwhile...

Notes

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pp. 351-401

Bibliography

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pp. 403-419

Index

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pp. 421-445