Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

Except for the Dred Scott decision of 1857, the most devastating judicial decision ever rendered against African Americans in the United States was perhaps the Supreme Court’s 1896 ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson. As a consequence of the Court’s legalization of “separate but equal,” constructions of...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

This book has been several years in the making, and I am indebted to many people for helping to bring it to fruition. Many of my colleagues at the University of Georgia read the manuscript in its entirety and offered suggestions for revisions, and I hope the book reflects our collective wisdom. For their insightful...

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ONE: More than a Matter of Segregation

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pp. 1-26

Black Americans had reason to be hopeful about the prospects of their being accepted as equal citizens as the nation approached the beginning of the second half of the twentieth century. Although race prejudice and discrimination remained deeply embedded in American society as the United States...

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TWO: “The Color Is Black”

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pp. 27-47

Horace Ward’s departure for Korea had granted university officials a temporary reprieve, but the possibility that blacks might be attending the University of Georgia in the foreseeable future was enough to ensure that the issue would be continuously debated even in Ward’s absence. Supreme Court decisions...

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THREE: “A Qualified Negro” [Includes Image Plates]

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pp. 48-66

Horace Ward’s two-year stint in the military was coming to an end, and he was scheduled to be discharged in August 1955. In July, state attorney general Eugene Cook released a statement to the press disclosing that he had been informed that Ward intended to reactivate immediately his suit in federal...

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FOUR: “Journey to the Horizons”

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pp. 67-110

Rosa Parks’s refusal to surrender her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama, on December 1, 1955, set in motion a series of events that would eventually transform a nation. The success of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Martin Luther King Jr.’s leadership role in it, signaled an...

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FIVE: Tolerated, but Not Integrated

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pp. 111-129

During the early 1960s young people throughout the South were trying to create and sustain the spirit of the civil rights movement. The success of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the subsequent creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), along with Martin Luther King Jr.’s...

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SIX: “Wouldn’t Take Nothing for My Journey Now”

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pp. 130-152

The desegregation of the University of Georgia was one of the great triumphs of Horace Ward’s career. By the time that Hamilton Holmes and Charlayne Hunter graduated in 1963, Ward had spent thirteen years of his life trying to crack segregation at uga. Even while finishing his law degree at Northwestern...

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EPILOGUE: Burying Unhappy Ghosts

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pp. 153-159

As the University of Georgia prepared to celebrate its bicentennial in 1985 university officials decided to seize the opportunity to begin a reconciliation with its first black undergraduate alumni, both of whom by now had distinguished themselves in their chosen careers. Hamilton Holmes had earned a...

Notes

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pp. 161-188

Bibliography

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pp. 189-197

Index

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pp. 199-205