Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-x

The editors would like to thank the Aid to Scholarly Publishing Program of SSHRC for its financial support for this book. This project has taken several years and has been helped by various people. In particular we would like to acknowledge the valuable comments made by the anonymous readers of the initial manuscript. ...

Part 1: Introduction

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Canadian Women Filmmakers: Re-imaging Authorship, Nationality, and Gender

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pp. 3-22

An introduction is a strangely duplex creature. At the same time that it ushers readers forward, preparing them for an encounter with texts marshalled for a particular intellectual purpose, it is inevitably retrospective, constructed from reflection on the reasons for the gathering in the first place. This introduction engages that double task by providing us, the co-editors of this collection of essays on Canadian women film directors, ...

Part 2: Feminist/Feminine Binaries and the Body Politic

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The Art of Craft: The Films of Andrea Dorfman

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pp. 25-42

In There’s a Flower in My Pedal (2004), director Andrea Dorfman contemplates the ways in which life’s mishaps and lost opportunities serve to make us stronger. Over a lazy, looping, mid-tempo hip-hop beat, Dorfman presents a series of observations about the disappointments—and delights—of everyday life. Pleasures derive from the incidental and overlooked as much as from the monumental and marked. ...

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Feminist Ambiguity in the Film Adaptations of Lynne Stopkewich

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pp. 43-66

Regardless of what new dystopian visions of deviance and desire Lynne Stopkewich may yet have in store for audiences, her name will probably always be synonymous with necrophilia. The Vancouver director’s first feature, Kissed (1996), which told the story of a seemingly normal suburban girl who studies embalming and sleeps with dead men, was just that sort of seared-on-the-brain debut: a shocking but also strangely palatable entry ...

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On the Edge of Genre: Anne Wheeler’s Interrogating Maternal Gaze

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pp. 67-94

By identifying herself as being “on the edge of genre,” Anne Wheeler is acknowledging, and lamenting, her curious insider–outsider status within Canadian film culture, where her work has been deemed either too commercial by cultural critics or not commercial enough by mainstream distributors/exhibitors. Despite Wheeler’s extensive body of film and television work, her many filmmaking awards, her six honorary doctorates, ...

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Fluidity: Joyce Wieland’s Political Cinema

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pp. 95-112

Joyce Wieland’s filmmaking was only one component of her production as an artist in many media. As well as films, she has produced paintings, sculptures, fabric, earthwork, stuffed plastic collages, wall hangings, bronze sculptures, lithographs, enormous installations, and small coloured pencil drawings. The important subjects of her work ...

Part 3: Queer Nation and Popular Culture

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The Art of Making Do: Queer Canadian Girls Make Movies

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pp. 115-126

In The Practice of Everyday Life, Michel de Certeau (1984) suggests that popular culture denotes an attitude toward cultural products and industries and their place in everyday life. His theory of the making of popular culture acknowledges a paucity of “friendly texts,” and it identifies both the hegemonic terms through which “the system provides” ...

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Feminist Filmmaking and the Cinema of Patricia Rozema

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pp. 127-140

Patricia Rozema has for over twenty years been one of Canada’s most significant and internationally acclaimed woman filmmakers. Examining her work within the context of feminism presents a particularly intriguing undertaking, given Rozema’s conflicted relationship with the idea of feminism and because film critics and feminist theorists ...

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Léa Pool: The Art of Elusiveness

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pp. 141-162

Swiss-born Léa Pool is one of the most distinctive film directors to have emerged in Canada in the last twenty-five years. Difficult and enthralling at the same time, her cinematic production has attracted much attention from critics, film theorists, and audiences alike. Based in Montreal since the mid-1970s, Pool has produced an interesting body of work that is both intellectually challenging and difficult to pinpoint.1 ...

Part 4: Transiting Nationality and the Battlefields of Otherness

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On the Field of Battle: First Nations Women Documentary Filmmakers

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pp. 165-184

How have First Nations women filmmakers imagined the Canadian nation? How has their work in the documentary mode perpetuated, abrogated, or subverted traditional imaginings of what constitutes the Canadian polity and its cultural identity? An examination of films from the 1990s by three women Native Canadian directors provides the basis of an answer to this question. ...

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Eradicating Erasure: The Documentary Film Practice of Sylvia Hamilton

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pp. 185-202

An acclaimed African Nova Scotian filmmaker, writer, educator, and activist, Sylvia Hamilton is dedicated to excavating and exposing the buried history, experiences, and contributions of Black Canadians. Throughout a career in film now spanning two decades, Hamilton has written, directed, and/or produced six award-winning documentary films along with an array of commissioned work, ...

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Women, Liminality, and “Unhomeliness” in the Films of Mina Shum

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pp. 203-216

Mina Shum prefers to be known as an independent filmmaker rather than a Canadian one, seeing this label as one way to get people to see her films “without prejudice.”1 What she seems reluctant to do is to signal belonging in a way that creates a sense of obligation, whether her own (to somehow brandish her national status in her films) or her audience’s (to fulfill their civic duty by watching them). ...

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Beyond Tradition and Modernity: The Transnational Universe

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pp. 217-232

Much has been written of Deepa Mehta’s in-between experience of the “old” country, India, and the “new” country, Canada, and of her dual displacement as a woman of colour and as an immigrant.1 However, as a versatile visual thinker and film auteur (she has scripted six of her twelve films), Mehta resists confinement to any single discursive paradigm, ...

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Les Québécoises

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pp. 233-250

Let’s leave aside questions of national cinema aside for the moment. It is important in the context of an anthology about women’s filmmaking in Canada1 to discuss how we have seen in the last twenty years the emergence of a group of women filmmakers working in Quebec who have redefined and in some cases moved entirely beyond traditions in Quebec cinema. ...

Contributors

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pp. 251-254

Index

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pp. 255-271