Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

THE RESEARCH FOR THIS BOOK HAS ABSORBED MANY YEARS; ALONG THE way I have incurred innumerable financial and intellectual debts. The early stage of my research was supported by fellowships from the Yale Center for International and Area Studies and the Yale Council for Southeast Asian Studies. ...

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A Note on the Text

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p. xi

THE PEOPLE WITH WHOM I WORKED SPOKE BOTH MALAYSIAN AND THEIR local Dusun dialect. It is not unusual for people to combine both languages in conversations. Although I relied mostly on Malaysian, I do know some Dusun and turned to a translator when I could not understand what was being said. The foreign words ...

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Introduction: Powerful Persuasions: Resource Control and State Rhetoric

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pp. 3-28

IN 1990, A PROMINENT POLITICIAN FROM SABAH, MALAYSIA, ANNOUNCED at an international conference on conservation and biodiversity that he intended to expand the boundaries of Kinabalu Park1 to include an area that supported species-rich tropical forests and was known locally as Bukit Hempuen (Hempuen Hill).2 ...

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1. Colliding Discourses: Western Land Laws and Native Customary Rights in North Borneo, 1881-1928

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pp. 29-66

THE IMPOSITION OF COLONIAL RULE IN NORTHERN BORNEO UNDER THE North Borneo Chartered Company (hereafter referred to as the Company) brought major changes to the landscape as the logic ofWestern-based property rights and economic rationality replaced indigenous rights to resources and local patterns of resource use. ...

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2. Redefining Native Customary Law in Govuton: Struggles over Property Rights between Native Peoples and Colonial Rulers

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pp. 67-98

THIS DESCRIPTION OF THE VILLAGE I WILL CALL GOVUTON IS AS ACCURATE at the end of the twentieth century as it was one hundred years ago in 1897 when the British colonial administrator William Dunlop depicted the village in his diary (see fig. 1). Although many of the landscape features Dunlop described are still the same, ...

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3. Resources, Ideologies, and Nationalism: The Politics of Development in Postcolonial Sabah

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pp. 99-121

THE EXERCISE OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT IN SABAH, WHICH DETERMINES access to and claims over resources, can be seen as a mechanism of state rule that justifies centralized control over local people and their lands.1 An analysis of political patronage systems and rural development programs in Sabah reveals that elements of state policies ...

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4. Land Disputes in Tempulong: Colonial Land Laws, Customary Practices, and the Postcolonial State, 1950–1996

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pp. 122-151

THE TRIP FROM GOVUTON TO TEMPULONG IS ONLY TWENTY MILES, BUT it is marked by dramatic changes in landscape and climate. Many mornings of the year, especially during the rainy season, Govuton is shrouded in clouds and mist, but as one drops from more than 4,000 feet to 1,800 feet above sea level the climatic change is striking. ...

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Conclusion: Imagining New Environmental Futures: Alternative Strategies for Natural Resource Governance

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pp. 152-166

WHILE THE PERIOD OF MY RESEARCH FOR THIS BOOK ENDED IN 1996, THE situation in Sabah in terms of native land rights, access to resources, and agricultural development remains much the same. There continues to be disagreement over which group of people have the right to call themselves “natives” and enjoy ...

Glossary

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pp. 167-170

Notes

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pp. 171-190

Bibliography

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pp. 191-212

Index

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pp. 213-224