Contents

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p. xi

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Introduction: Printing and Prophecy

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pp. 1-14

The prophet is, first and foremost, a media phenomenon. Whether in biblical narrative or medieval history, what denes a prophet is not the prediction of future events but the communicative claims made by the...

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Chapter 1: The Sibyl's Book

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pp. 15-38

To speak of Gutenberg's literary contributions seems, at first glance, perverse, for he left behind no lyrical or prose compositions, if any ever existed. Instead, his life is known, all too incompletely, from official documents and...

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Chapter 2: Prophets in Print

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pp. 39-61

While the combination of astrology and prophecy had been debated by many and attempted by some for centuries, Johannes Lichtenberger's Prognosticatio of 1488 was the first successful combination of both...

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Chapter 3: Prophets and Their Readers

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pp. 62-84

The closer relative and nearer antecedent of Johannes Lichtenberger's Prognosticatio was not any of the monumental editions of Birgitta of Sweden's collected works but, rather, an early fifteenth-century compilation...

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Chapter 4: Visions of Visions: Functions of the Image in Printed Prophecy

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pp. 85-108

What do illustrations do? For those in late medieval and early modern printed books, Edgar Bierende identifies three basic functions: to delight, to teach in parallel to the text, and to help structure the reader's memory of the text. In addition, Bierende...

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Chapter 5: Practica Teutsch

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pp. 109-130

It should now be clear why works of popular astrology must be included in a study of prophecy in early modern society: the ties between the two fields are too numerous, the reciprocal influence too pervasive, and the...

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Chapter 6: Fear, Floods, and the Paradox of the Practica Teutsch

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pp. 131-150

As works that emphasized their foundation on scientific principles and that were intended to explain the workings of the world for a broad audience, practicas reflected anxieties over the shifting foundations of knowledge in early...

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Conclusion: The Prophetic Reader

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pp. 151-154

In the first centuries after Gutenberg, prophecy in its many forms provided a significant segment of the print market, a model of the social and semiotic interactions of authors with their audiences, and a metaphor for...

Appendix: Prophecy and Prognostication in Print, 1450-1550

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pp. 155-203

Notes

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pp. 205-243

Bibliography

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pp. 245-258

Index

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pp. 259-265