We cannot verify your location
Browse Book and Journal Content on Project MUSE
OR

Public Forgetting

The Rhetoric and Politics of Beginning Again

Bradford Vivian

Publication Year: 2010

Published by: Penn State University Press

Front Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. ix-xi

I acknowledge, with gratitude, permission to use revised versions of earlier publications. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 have been adapted from, respectively, “Neoliberal Epideictic: Rhetorical Form and Commemorative Politics on September 11, 2002,” Quarterly Journal of Speech 92 (2006): 1–26; “The Art of Forgetting: John W. Draper and the Rhetorical Dimensions of History,” ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 1-16

Memory is unavoidably, and sometimes maddeningly, inconstant. It sustains a sense of the past in bewilderingly protean ways. Shelley’s “Ozymandias” commemorates the ruins of a once-grandiose edifice of memory—a colossus intended to so impressively amplify the fame of Ramses the Great that his renown would stand undiminished against the erosions of time. The massive idol promised to immortalize its subject in such grandeur that even ...

Part 1: Forgetting in Public Life: An Idiomatic History of the Present

read more

1. The Two Rivers, Past and Present

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 19-38

I contend that one cannot understand in full the nature of prevailing rhetorical resources for assigning significance to forgetting in public culture without studying their patent family resemblance to traditional tropes and figures of forgetting. The textual sources of these tropes and figures—all manner of intellectual, spiritual, and artistic reflections on memory and its fortunes in the Western tradition—are legion. The present chapter provides ...

read more

2. Forgetting Without Oblivion

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 39-60

The symbolism of oblivion hasn’t always been used to the detriment of forgetting (at least not intentionally). A host of past and present thinkers have employed the dark imagery of forgetting in order to assert its conventionally unacknowledged merits; however, such putatively affirmative treatments of forgetting as willed oblivion, symbolic erasure, or strategic amnesia assign ...

Part II: Public Forgetting: Alternate Histories, New Heuristics

read more

3. Hallowed Ground, Hollow Memory: Rhetorical Form and Commemorative Politics on September 11, 2002

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 63-88

Public commemorations influence collective thought and behavior by assigning normative meaning to signal dimensions of the communal past. Regardless of such authority, however, traditional state-sponsored commemorations fail as often as they succeed in their ostensible purpose: to enrich public understanding of the past and to stimulate robust civic participation in adherence to its lessons. “Being told to remember,” Margalit ...

read more

4. Historical Forgetting: John W. Draper and the Rhetorical Dimensions of History

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 89-111

One logical and patently modern response to the questionable culture of memory documented in Chapter 3 would be to invoke professional history as a corrective to its aesthetic excesses. Throughout modernity and late modernity, professional history has maintained its reputation for supplying nominally unembellished historical fact as a means of counteracting instances of selective revision, obfuscation, or distortion that breed ...

read more

5. Cultural Forgetting: The “Timeless Now” of Nomadic Memories

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 112-132

Thus begins Quentin Compson’s existential sojourn in William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, a literary masterpiece whose true subject, more than any character, may be the poignant influence of memory on the experiences of its several narrators. Faulkner’s plot is comprised of four sections, each with a different narrator relating the events of four different days. The echoes of the past suffuse the various narratives, as if the nature ...

read more

6. Moral and Political Forgetting: Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 133-167

Abraham Lincoln’s rhetoric of moral and political forgetting in his signature wartime addresses, the Gettysburg Address and the Second Inaugural, resolve lingering questions raised by the examples of public forgetting previously analyzed in this book. Lincoln’s speeches evince a more refined framework of historical judgment than John W. Draper’s ambitious program of historical forgetting. They also inaugurate, in contrast to the Gypsy ethic ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 168-181

Forgetting has a bad reputation. The worry that it typically inspires is a product of the language that ancients and moderns alike have used to describe it. The disconsolate trope of oblivion is a common linguistic denominator spanning the many troubling depictions of forgetting in historical as well contemporary discourses on memory, history, and mortality. One of Shakespeare’s ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 183-188

References

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 189-204

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 205-212

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
pp. 224-224


E-ISBN-13: 9780271053462
E-ISBN-10: 0271053461
Print-ISBN-13: 9780271036663
Print-ISBN-10: 0271036664

Page Count: 216
Publication Year: 2010

OCLC Number: 780531466
MUSE Marc Record: Download for Public Forgetting