In this Book

Bodies of Reform
summary

“James Salazar takes the term ‘character’—pervasive and elusive—and accounts for its centrality by showing how it embodies the contradictions of modern America. In a series of intricate literary readings, he analyzes the ways in which the late-nineteenth-century obsession with building ‘character’ vivified social distinctions but also, in its instabilities, became the pivot for critique.”

Table of Contents

  1. Front matter
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  1. Contents
  2. p. v
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-35
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  1. 1. Philanthropic Taste: Race and Character in Herman Melville’s The Confidence-Man
  2. pp. 36-62
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  1. 2. Character Is Capital
  2. pp. 63-111
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  1. 3. Muscle Memory
  2. pp. 112-156
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  1. 4. “A Story Written on Her Face”: Pauline Hopkins’s Unmaking of the Inherited Character of Race
  2. pp. 157-203
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  1. 5. Character’s Conduct: Spaces of Interethnic Emulation in Jane Addams’s “Charitable Effort”
  2. pp. 204-242
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 243-284
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 285-300
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  1. About the Author
  2. p. 301
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