Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Voices in the Kitchen owes its foundation, most of all, to women of the charlas culinarias. I take this opportunity to say estoy muy agradecida por sus palabras: Liduvina V

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Introduction: What’s for Breakfast? Los chilaquiles de mi ’amá, of course!

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pp. 3-17

We have all heard from nutritionists that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. While I have ignored it on many occasions, this time I will follow the experts’ advice and begin with the breakfast that gives this book its basic yet essential nourishment: los chilaquiles de mi ’amá. This dish flavors the premise of Voices in the...

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Chapter 1. A Place of Their Own: Appropriating the Kitchen Space

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pp. 18-49

For V

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Chapter 2. Saz

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pp. 50-77

By using her hand as the measuring utensil, Irma Vásquez knows how much water she needs so her rice cooks to perfection. While confident in the efficiency of her sazón, a sensory way of knowing, Vásquez cannot explain the intrinsic logic of her touch. She only knows it works. Vásquez’s sensory utensil, in this case her hand...

Image Plates

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Chapter 3. Homemade Culinary Art (El arte culinario casero): Cooks-as-Artists

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pp. 78-108

Alma Welty in a charla culinaria held in her home’s kitchen in Puebla, Mexico, defines quotidian cuisine as el arte culinario casero. “I have always said that culinary art is an amazing thing. How wonderful when you see that what you have cooked is eaten with such pleasure. . . . And truthfully [cooking] is easy. All that is...

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Chapter 4. Kitchen Talk: Cooks-as-Writers

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pp. 109-134

When Alma Contreras, my sister, explains how she developed her recipe for making what in our family is known as Alma’s famosas enchiladas, she expresses part of her identity, of her life: “Okay, one time I made a salsa with oregano using el molcajete [mortar and pestle], and I thought of putting it in the middle before putting in...

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Chapter 5. The Literary Kitchen: Writers-as-Cooks

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pp. 135-163

Food is life. Food as knowledge feeds our hunger for understanding, for belonging, and our need for change. Literature explores the depth of our hunger. Food in literature pacifies such hunger. M. F. K. Fisher, food writer, cooks because she is hungry for love, for understanding, and for community.1 Lorna Dee Cervantes, Chicana poet...

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Conclusion: Maybe Dessert First? Charlas Culinarias

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pp. 164-170

Often when I go out to dinner, especially to a new restaurant, my inclination is to look first at the desserts. Knowing what I want to have for dessert determines what the main course will be. Following this logic, that dessert determines the meal, I want to close with one more taste of the charla culinarias. They have, in fact, become...

Notes

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pp. 171-210

Bibliography

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pp. 211-230

Index

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pp. 231-240