Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. -1

Contents

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p. ix

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xvi

Gradually, it became clear to me that the most interesting stories lay not at the top, in the church hierarchy, but at the base of society, in the individuals and parishes struggling to find their way, endeavoring to regain certain aspects of the past and attempting to reconstruct their lives. They provided ways of viewing Russia’s historic transformation that were personal yet also related to a much larger ...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-24

This endeavor has witnessed the attempts of many movements and groups, ranging from fascist to democratic, to provide a vision for the future. A major player in the drama is the Russian Orthodox Church, courted by the main participants, especially by the nationalist-patriots and the Communists, but also by the proponents of an open, civil ...

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1. Religion and Politics at the End of the Soviet Era

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pp. 25-52

His body was found not far from the house where he lived, near the railroad platform of Semkhoz of the Zagorskii district in the Moscow region. Doctors certified the death from the loss of blood inflicted by a severe blow to the head.”1 The news bulletin cited only the bare details of Fr Aleksandr’s significance. Age fifty-five, he had served as a leading dissident during the Brezhnev ...

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2. The Church’s Struggle for Renewal

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pp. 53-73

This struggle for legitimacy pitted political power against moral authority, the military and police strength of the state existing above against the popular grassroots voices coming from below. These grassroots elements were propelled in part by anger and disillusionment with the current government structure and ideology. But they were also looking for sources of meaning and guidance within their own cultural traditions. ...

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3. Father Georgii Kochetkov and the Politics of Memory

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pp. 74-108

It was this concept of conciliarity, sustained by love and freedom, that the nineteenth-century Slavophile theologian Aleksei Stepanovich Khomiakov defined as one of the keystones of Orthodoxy. In his view, the church was not an authority, but a union of free believers who were organically connected. “In the fullness of its divine doctrine,” Khomiakov emphasized, Orthodox Christianity ...

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4. Novodevichy and the Redefinition of History

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pp. 109-147

Novodevichy Monastery in Moscow stands on the banks of the Moskva River near the junction of the Okruzhenaia Railway embankment. When one approaches the monastery in late afternoon, the sun setting over the river, the blue and gold cupolas of the monastery are spectacular. From the time of my first visit as a student some thirty-five years ago, I have thought of this as a ...

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5. Education and a New Society

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pp. 148-181

Following the collapse of the communist state, Patriarch Aleksi II identified religious education of the Russian people as the church’s most important challenge. The greatest wrong wrecked on our society by the Soviet government, the patriarch said, was its moral and spiritual assault. This attack on the base of our humanity was the deepest “wound inflicted by the Communist dictatorship.” ...

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6. Conclusion

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pp. 182-191

Word of her death two days earlier had spread rapidly throughout the city, and on the day of her funeral, crowds of people overflowed the spacious church that stood near the center of the monastery whose monastic life she had done so much to restore. Spilling out into the courtyard, these people had come to see Mother Serafima off on “the way of all the earth.”1 Standing in the crowd were not only many ...

Notes

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pp. 193-220

Bibliography

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pp. 221-240

Index

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pp. 241-251