Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-v

Contents

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p. vii

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The Magic Force of the Spoken Word

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pp. 1-13

National Socialism was the most prolific rhetorical movement of the twentieth century.1 It depended on public speaking both from necessity (particularly in its early years) and principle. Hitler expressed the party's fundamental focus on public speaking in his semi-autobiographical book Mein Kampf, published in 1925: "[T]he power which has always started the greatest religious and ...

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Adolf Hitler: Reestablishing the National Socialist German Workers Party, 27 February 1925

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pp. 14-31

Hitler joined the tiny German Workers Party in 1919. He quickly became its leader. On 9 November 1923, at the height of the great German inflation (on 20 November, one U.S. dollar was equal to four trillion German marks), Hitler risked a coup. He led his followers through the streets of Munich to the Feldherrnhalle, a war memorial, where waiting police opened fire. Sixteen of Hitler's followers were killed; Hitler himself ...

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Joseph Goebbels: "The Storm is Coming", 9 July 1932

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pp. 32-39

Hitler sent Joseph Goebbels (1897-1945) to Berlin in 1926 to take charge of an ineffective party organization in Germany's capital. Goebbels set to work, speaking widely and establishing a weekly newspaper titled Der Angriff (The Attack). He quickly made the Nazis visible in Berlin.

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Joseph Goebbels: Propaganda and Public Enlightenment, 6 September 1934

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pp. 40-51

In the United States, propaganda was, and remains, a dirty word. Not so to the Nazis. Two months after Hitler took power, he appointed Goebbels to head the newly established Ministry for Public Enlightenment and Propaganda. Goebbels argued that the methods of propaganda are morally neutral. There was no such thing as inherently "good" propaganda or "bad" propaganda methods. The criterion is whether or not propaganda is used for good ends.

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Gertrud Scholtz-Klink: Duties and Tasks of the Woman in the National Socialist State, October 1936

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pp. 52-65

National Socialism was a male-dominated movement. Hitler and the Nazis saw a woman's highest duty as bearing children, and the more the better. They instituted a medal for mothers who had given birth to at least four children. Politics and the professions were male preserves. Although the Nazis did not prohibit women from holding jobs before World War II began, they made it clear that women had better things to do than seek success in the male arena.

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Gerhard Wagner: Race and Population Policy, 11 September 1936

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pp. 66-78

Gerhard Wagner (1888-1938), a physician, was head of the National Socialist German Physicians' Association and also held other important positions. He gave speeches at the annual Nuremberg rallies that outlined Nazi racial and medical views. The Nuremberg rallies not only had huge audiences at the scene, but also were reprinted in most newspapers, and republished in ...

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Joseph Goebbels: "Our Hitler", 19 April 1937

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pp. 79-85

Each year from 1933 to 1945, with the exception of 1934, Joseph Goebbels delivered a radio speech on the eve of Hitler's birthday, 20 April. The speech was carried in every major newspaper, and most were reprinted in collections of Goebbels's work. Each speech concluded with some variant of the phrase that ends this speech: "May he remain to us what he always was and is: Our Hitler!"

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Julius Streicher: Speech after "The Night of Broken Glass", 10 November 1938

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pp. 86-93

Julius Streicher (1885-1946) was among Hitler's earliest followers, and the most prominent and crudest Nazi anti-Semite. He published the weekly newspaper Der Stürmer between 1923 and 1945, each issue of which was devoted entirely to revolting anti-Semitic propaganda.1 Streicher was also Gauleiter, or regional leader, of the Nazi Party in Nuremberg. He was executed for crimes against humanity by the Nuremberg International Military Tribunal after World War II.

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Adolf Hitler: To the Old Guard in Munich, 8 November 1941

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pp. 94-111

Hitler spoke annually at three key dates on the Nazi calendar: 30 January, the anniversary of his takeover of power in 1933, 24 February, the anniversary of the proclamation of the party platform in 1920, and on the evening of 8 November to commemorate his 1923 attempt to take power by a revolution (the "Beer Hall Putsch"). The immediate audience for the 8 November speech ...

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Joseph Goebbels: "Total War", 18 February 1943

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pp. 112-139

Goebbels's "Total War" speech of 18 February 1943, may be the single most famous Nazi speech. It came at a turning point in the war. When Hitler spoke in November 1941, victory seemed sure. German armies were everywhere victorious. The winter of 1941-1942 was a shock. Hitler had not expected the Russians to hold out, and the German army was ill-prepared for winter. The Russians counterattacked. The German front shook-but held.

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Model Speeches for Nazi Leaders, 1944-1945

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pp. 140-149

So far, the speeches in this book were delivered by major Nazi leaders to large audiences. There were many more speeches that had a more limited audience. On a national holiday, such as the anniversary of the Nazi takeover on 30 January 1933 or Hitler's birthday on 20 April, each party local group (there were over 20,000 in 1939) was expected to hold a meeting. A local party ...

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Adolf Hitler: Adolf Hitler's Last Speech, 30 January 1945

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pp. 150-156

On 30 January 1933, Hitler became chancellor of Germany. In the twelve years that followed, the anniversary of the Nazi assumption of power was a national holiday. Hitler always gave a speech, broadcast to the nation by radio and printed in full in the newspapers. This speech, delivered on 30 January 1945, was Hitler's final public speech.1

Acknowledgments

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p. 157

Index

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pp. 159-164