In this Book

The Fat Studies Reader
summary

Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Publication Award from the Association for Women in Psychology

Winner of the 2010 Susan Koppelman Award for the Best Edited Volume in Women’s Studies from the Popular Culture Association

We have all seen the segments on television news shows: A fat person walking on the sidewalk, her face out of frame so she can't be identified, as some disconcerting findings about the "obesity epidemic" stalking the nation are read by a disembodied voice. And we have seen the movies—their obvious lack of large leading actors silently speaking volumes. From the government, health industry, diet industry, news media, and popular culture we hear that we should all be focused on our weight. But is this national obsession with weight and thinness good for us? Or is it just another form of prejudice—one with especially dire consequences for many already disenfranchised groups?

For decades a growing cadre of scholars has been examining the role of body weight in society, critiquing the underlying assumptions, prejudices, and effects of how people perceive and relate to fatness. This burgeoning movement, known as fat studies, includes scholars from every field, as well as activists, artists, and intellectuals. The Fat Studies Reader is a milestone achievement, bringing together fifty-three diverse voices to explore a wide range of topics related to body weight. From the historical construction of fatness to public health policy, from job discrimination to social class disparities, from chick-lit to airline seats, this collection covers it all.

Edited by two leaders in the field, The Fat Studies Reader is an invaluable resource that provides a historical overview of fat studies, an in-depth examination of the movement's fundamental concerns, and an up-to-date look at its innovative research.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Foreword: Fat Studies: An Invitation to Revolution
  2. pp. xi-xxv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. xxvii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-7
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I: What Is Fat Studies? The Social and Historical Construction of Fatness
  2. p. 9
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. The Inner Corset: A Brief History of Fat in the United States
  2. pp. 11-14
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Fattening Queer History: Where Does Fat History Go from Here?
  2. pp. 15-22
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II: Fat Studies in Health and Medicine
  2. p. 23
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. Does Social Class Explain the Connection Between Weight and Health?
  2. pp. 25-36
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. Is “Permanent Weight Loss” an Oxymoron? The Statistics on Weight Loss and the National Weight Control Registry
  2. pp. 37-40
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. What Is “Health at Every Size”?
  2. pp. 41-53
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Widening the Dialogue to Narrow the Gap in Health Disparities: Approaches to Fat Black Lesbian and Bisexual Women’s Health Promotion
  2. pp. 54-64
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. Quest for a Cause: The Fat Gene, the Gay Gene, and the New Eugenics
  2. pp. 65-74
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Prescription for Harm: Diet Industry Influence, Public Health Policy, and the “Obesity Epidemic”
  2. pp. 75-87
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. Public Fat: Canadian Provincial Governments and Fat on the Web
  2. pp. 88-96
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. That Remains to Be Said: Disappeared Feminist Discourses on Fat in Dietetic Theory and Practice
  2. pp. 97-105
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. Fatness (In)visible: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and the Rhetoric of Normative Femininity
  2. pp. 106-109
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part III: Fatness as Social Inequality
  2. pp. 111-112
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. Fat Kids, Working Moms, and the “Epidemic of Obesity: ”Race, Class, and Mother Blame
  2. pp. 113-119
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 13. Fat Youth as Common Targets for Bullying
  2. pp. 120-126
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 14. Bon Bon Fatty Girl: A Qualitative Exploration of Weight Bias in Singapore
  2. pp. 127-138
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 15. Part-Time Fatso
  2. pp. 139-142
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 16. Double Stigma: Fat Men and Their Male Admirers
  2. pp. 143-150
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 17. The Shape of Abuse: Fat Oppression as a Form of Violence Against Women
  2. pp. 151-157
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 18. Fat Women as “Easy Targets”: Achieving Masculinity Through Hogging
  2. pp. 158-166
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 19. No Apology: Shared Struggles in Fat and Transgender Law
  2. pp. 167-175
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 20. Access to the Sky: Airplane Seats and Fat Bodies as Contested Spaces
  2. pp. 176-186
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 21. Neoliberalism and the Constitution of Contemporary Bodies
  2. pp. 187-196
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 22. Sitting Pretty: Fat Bodies, Classroom Desks, and Academic Excess
  2. pp. 197-204
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 23. Stigma Threat and the Fat Professor: Reducing Student Prejudice in the Classroom
  2. pp. 205-212
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 24. Fat Stories in the Classroom: What and How Are They Teaching About Us?
  2. pp. 213-220
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part IV: Size-ism in Popular Culture and Literature
  2. p. 221
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 25. Fat Girls and Size Queens: Alternative Publications and the Visualizing of Fat and Queer Eroto-politics in Contemporary American Culture
  2. pp. 223-230
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 26. Fat Girls Need Fiction
  2. pp. 231-234
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 27. Fat Heroines in Chick-Lit: Gateway to Acceptance in the Mainstream?
  2. pp. 235-240
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 28. The Fat of the (Border)land: Food, Flesh, and Hispanic Masculinity in Willa Cather’s Death Comes for the Archbishop
  2. pp. 241-248
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 29. Placing Fat Women on Center Stage
  2. pp. 249-255
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 30. “The White Man’s Burden”: Female Sexuality, Tourist Postcards, and the Place of the Fat Woman in Early 20th-Century U.S. Culture
  2. pp. 256-262
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 31. The Roseanne Benedict Arnolds: How Fat Women Are Betrayed by Their Celebrity Icons
  2. pp. 263-270
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 32. Jiggle in My Walk: The Iconic Power of the “Big Butt” in American Pop Culture
  2. pp. 271-279
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 33. Seeing Through the Layers: Fat Suits and Thin Bodies in The Nutty Professor and Shallow Hal
  2. pp. 280-288
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 34. Controlling the Body: Media Representations, Body Size, and Self-Discipline
  2. pp. 289-296
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part V: Embodying and Embracing Fatness
  2. p. 297
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 35. “I’m Allowed to Be a Sexual Being”: The Distinctive Social Conditions of the Fat Burlesque Stage
  2. pp. 299-304
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 36. Embodying Fat Liberation
  2. pp. 305-311
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 37. Not Jane Fonda: Aerobics for Fat Women Only
  2. pp. 312-319
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 38. Exorcising the Exercise Myth: Creating Women of Substance
  2. pp. 320-324
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part VI: Starting the Revolution
  2. pp. 325-326
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 39. Maybe It Should Be Called Fat American Studies
  2. pp. 327-333
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 40. Are We Ready to Throw Our Weight Around? Fat Studies and Political Activism
  2. pp. 334-340
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix A: Fat Liberation Manifesto, November 1973
  2. pp. 341-342
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Appendix B: Legal Briefs
  2. pp. 343-350
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. About the Contributors
  2. pp. 351-357
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 359-365
  3. restricted access Download |
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.