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Questions About Questions
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summary
The social survey has become an essential tool in modern society, providing crucial measurements of social change, describing social life, and guiding government policy. But the validity of surveys is fragile and depends ultimately upon the accuracy of answers to survey questions. Recently featured in The New York Times, Questions About Questions brings together experts in cognitive psychology, linguistics, and survey research to probe the relationship between the presentation and interpretation of questions and the accuracy of survey responses.   "these chapters provide a good sense of the range of survey problems investigated by the cognitive movement, the methods and ideas it draws upon, and the results it has yielded." —American Journal of Sociology  

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. p. i
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  1. Title Page, Dedication
  2. pp. iii-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xiii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. xv
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  1. Members of the Social Science Research Council Committee on Cognition and Survey Research
  2. p. xvi
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  1. WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL COMMITTEE ON COGNITION AND SURVEY RESEARCH
  2. pp. xvii-xxi
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  1. Part I: Introduction
  2. p. 1
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  1. 1. Cognitive Aspects of Surveys and This Volume
  2. pp. 3-12
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  1. Part II: Meaning
  2. p. 13
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  1. 2. Asking Questions and Influencing Answers
  2. pp. 15-48
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  1. 3. Direct Questioning About Comprehension in a Survey Setting
  2. pp. 49-61
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  1. Part III: Memory
  2. p. 63
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  1. 4. Personal Recall and the Limits of Retrospective Questions in Surveys
  2. pp. 65-94
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  1. 5. Improving Episodic Memory Performance of Survey Respondents
  2. pp. 95-101
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  1. 6. Memory and Mismemory for Health Events
  2. pp. 102-137
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  1. 7. Attempts to Improve the Accuracy of Self-Reports of Voting
  2. pp. 138-153
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  1. 8. Applying Cognitive Theory in Public Health Investigations: Enhancing Food Recall with the Cognitive Interview
  2. pp. 154-169
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  1. Part IV: EXPRESSION: THE CASE OF ATTITUDE MEASUREMENT IN SURVEYS
  2. p. 171
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  1. 9. Opportunities in Survey Measurement of Attitudes
  2. pp. 173-176
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  1. 10. The Case for Measuring Attitude Strength in Surveys
  2. pp. 177-203
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  1. 11. New Technologies for the Direct and Indirect Assessment of Attitudes
  2. pp. 204-237
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  1. Part V: SOCIAL INTERACTION
  2. p. 239
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  1. 12. Validity and the Collaborative Construction of Meaning in Face-to-Face Surveys
  2. pp. 241-267
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  1. Part VI: GOVERNMENT APPLICATIONS
  2. p. 269
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  1. 13. A Review of Research at the Bureau of Labor Statistics
  2. pp. 271-290
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  1. Name Index
  2. pp. 291-298
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  1. Subject Index
  2. pp. 299-306
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