cover

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title page

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copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

On a warm autumn day in 1968 two friends, one white, one Mexican American, were talking in the lunch line at a Catholic grammar school. The Anglo child, the son of a prominent local banker, had been talking about his family’s summer getaway on a lake where they swam, fished, hiked, and generally had...

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Introduction

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p. xv

Carlos sol

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1 From Mexican Colony to Anglo Stronghold

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pp. 3-23

Victoria began as a small empresario community along the banks of the Guadalupe River in 1824. The subsequent twelve years marked a brief period of relative racial harmony in the colony comprised of a majority of Mexican families and...

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2 “For God, for Country, for Home”

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pp. 24-48

The roots of the Catholic faith in Victoria, Texas, can be traced to the founding of the city by empresario Don Mart

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3 Creating Loyal Citizens

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pp. 49-76

The Mexican Americans’ identity in Victoria was shaped partly by experiences with the Victoria public schools. Originally excluded from the school system, later included but segregated, and finally nominally integrated, Mexican American students...

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4 “By the Power of Reason”

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pp. 77-98

Throughout the post–World War II period, Mexican Americans formed clubs and associations designed to help them carve out a place of equality in Victoria.1 Some such organizations were working class in composition; in others, the middle..

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5 Strength through Adversity

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pp. 99-124

Just as Mexican Americans in Victoria employed fraternal organizations and sought educational equality to express and promote their views of citizenship, so too did they turn to political action. Prior to World War II most Mexican Americans remained politically quiescent. Ongoing activity at the polls, on the stump and in...

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Conclusion

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pp. 125-128

Victoria’s Mexican American history appears to be a departure from the standard historiography on Tejano communities that argues that a questioning of mainstream institutional life and confrontational tactics were the norm, particularly during the 1960s and after. Historians who have researched...

Notes

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pp. 129-146

Bibliography

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pp. 147-158

Index

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pp. 159-166