Cover

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Title Page

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pp. i-iii

Copyright

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p. iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Editorial Advisory Board

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p. vii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xii

Whenever I’m struggling to spell a word correctly, I usually look at my hand. I want to see how my hand (finger) spells the word. It’s one of my idiosyncratic behaviors that my partner and friends have gotten used to over the years, a manifestation of my Deaf cultural connection...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xiii

We would like to give special thanks to Ceil Lucas, series editor of Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities, for her generous invitation to work on this volume. It is a tremendous opportunity for the advancement of Coda-related research and will be a much-needed infusion of...

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xxxviii

The chapters in this 14th volume of the Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities series provide both data-based research and personal writings on the richness and complexity of the lives of hearing people in Deaf families. Topics range from bimodal bilingualism in adults; the cultural...

Part I

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Bimodal Bilingualism

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pp. 3-43

Separate perceptual and motoric systems provide speech–sign or “bimodal” bilinguals with the unique opportunity to produce and perceive their two languages at the same time. In contrast, speech–speech or “unimodal” bilinguals cannot simultaneously produce two spoken...

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The Face of Bimodal Bilingualism: ASL Grammatical Markers Are Produced When Bilinguals Speak to English Monolinguals

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pp. 44-53

Bilinguals fluent in a signed and a spoken language (bimodal bilinguals) allow us to address fundamental questions about shared syntactic representations and language control. Because their two languages are produced by different articulators, they can simultaneously produce elements from...

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Coda Talk: Bimodal Discourse Among Hearing, Native Signers

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pp. 54-96

“Oh, so you are the only person that can hear in your family?” “Yes, but I am not hearing . . .” This was the surprising response from a woman I was talking to who had just finished telling me she had deaf parents and a deaf sibling. Left somewhat perplexed by this comment, I tried to figure out why there was a misunderstanding...

Part II

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Bimodal Language Acquisition in Kodas

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pp. 99-131

Hearing children growing up in Deaf families, or Kodas (kids of deaf adults), will learn a sign language as well as a spoken language. A necessary condition is that Kodas are exposed to both languages. They will learn the spoken language by interacting with not only hearing adults or children, but also with their...

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Eyes over Ears: The Development of Visual Strategies by Hearing Children of Deaf Parents

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pp. 132-161

Psycholinguistic studies have highlighted the critical importance parents play in children’s language acquisition (Gleason, 2005). But there still remains much that we do not know. For instance, how important is adult speech and audition for language acquisition? What is the role of gesture and other visual strategies...

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Sociolinguistic Aspects of the Communication Between Hearing Children and Deaf Parents

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pp. 162-194

The quality of communication within a family plays a significant role in a child’s emotional and social development. Many researchers have examined the communication patterns between hearing children of Deaf parents (Codas) and their parents, focusing primarily on the acquisition...

Part III

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Brazilian Codas: Libras and Portuguese in Contact Zones

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pp. 197-215

Brazil is still considered a monolingual country whose official language is Portuguese. Nevertheless, there are many other languages spoken, making it a multilingual country. As stated by Oliveira, In Brazil nearly 210 languages are spoken by nearly one million Brazilian citizens for whom Portuguese is not their mother...

Part IV

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Exploring Linguistic and Cultural Identity: My Personal Experience

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pp. 219-243

I am the eldest child of a deaf couple in England. My father was the only deaf person in his family, and he was raised orally. He learned British Sign Language (BSL) when he met my mother and now uses BSL as his preferred language for communication. He works in a hearing-dominated...

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Virgilean Guides: Esthetic Subjects in Coda Autobiographies

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pp. 244-260

As soon as Deaf parents learn that their baby is hearing and decide not to sign but to speak to her, they are perceiving her as Other (Singleton & Tittle, 2000, 226). They pass on their own trauma of being the deaf children of hearing parents under reversed circumstances...

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Characteristics of the Coda Experience in 21st-Century Contemporary Culture

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pp. 261-292

Seven years ago, I met several Codas (adults who have deaf parents) in British Sign Language (BSL) classes and learned their stories about everyday life. I heard happy and funny stories as well as some that were a little sad. Previous to that, I had met Deaf people with hearing children...

Contributors

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pp. 293-298

Index

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pp. 299-311