In this Book

Women and Deafness
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summary
This new collection bridges two dynamic academic fields: Women’s Studies and Deaf Studies. The 14 contributors to this interdisciplinary volume apply research and methodological approaches from sociology, ethnography, literary/film studies, history, rhetoric, education, and public health to open heretofore unexplored territory. Part One: In and Out of the Community addresses female dynamics within deaf schools; Helen Keller’s identity as a deaf woman; deaf women’s role in Deaf organizations; and whether or not the inequity in education and employment opportunities for deaf women is bias against gender or disability. Part Two: (Women’s) Authority and Shaping Deafness explores the life of 19th-century teacher Marcelina Ruis Y Fernandez; the influence of single, hearing female instructors in deaf education; the extent of women’s authority over oralist educational dictates during the 1900s; and a deaf daughter’s relationship with her hearing mother in the late 20th century. Part Three: Reading Deaf Women considers two deaf sisters’ exceptional creative freedom from 1885 to 1920; the depictions of deaf or mute women in two popular films; a Deaf woman’s account of blending the public–private, deaf–hearing, and religious–secular worlds; how five Deaf female ASL teachers define “gender,” “feminism,” “sex,” and “patriarchy” in ASL and English; and 20th-century American Deaf beauty pageants that emphasize physicality while denying Deaf identity, yet also challenge mainstream notions of “the perfect body.”

Table of Contents

  1. cover
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  1. Title Page
  2. pp. i-iii
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  1. Copyright
  2. p. iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. vii-xiv
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  1. Part One
  2. p. 1
  1. In and Out of the Community: Editors’ Introduction
  2. pp. 3-4
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  1. Family Matters
  2. pp. 5-20
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  1. Was Helen Keller Deaf? Blindness, Deafness, and Multiple Identities
  2. pp. 21-39
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  1. The Extended Family: Deaf Women in Organizations
  2. pp. 40-56
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  1. Deaf Women and Inequality in Educational Attainment and Occupational Status: Is Deafness or Femaleness to Blame?
  2. pp. 57-77
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  1. Part Two
  2. p. 79
  1. (Women’s) Authority and Shaping Deafness: Editors’ Introduction
  2. pp. 81-83
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  1. Marcelina Ruiz Ricote y Ferna
  2. pp. 84-109
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  1. The Ladies Take Charge: Women Teachers in the Education of Deaf Students
  2. pp. 110-129
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  1. ‘‘Like Ordinary Hearing Children’’: Mothers Raising Offspring according to Oralist Dictates
  2. pp. 130-146
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  1. Merging Two Worlds
  2. pp. 147-163
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  1. Part Three
  2. p. 165
  1. Reading Deaf Women: Editors’ Introduction
  2. pp. 167-169
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  1. Deaf Eyes: The Allen Sisters’ Photography, 1885–1920
  2. pp. 170-188
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  1. The Aesthetics of Linguistic Envy: Deafness and Muteness in Children of a Lesser God and The Piano
  2. pp. 189-204
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  1. ‘‘Slain in the Spirit’’
  2. pp. 205-225
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  1. How Deaf Women Produce Gendered Signs
  2. pp. 226-241
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  1. ‘‘Beautiful, though Deaf’’: The Deaf American Beauty Pageant
  2. pp. 242-261
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 263-284
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 285-287
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 289-298
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