Title Page

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Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

On September 10, 1861, applause shook the walls of Institute Hall in Charleston, South Carolina. The audience cheered its local men, most of them German-born, who had volunteered as soldiers for the Confederacy. Having enjoyed a “stirring and patriotic address in the tongue...

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1. Yankee Dutchmen: Germans, the Union, and the Construction of Wartime Identity

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pp. 11-55

For all the debate about states’ rights and slavery being the cause of the American Civil War, the actual conflict was fought between military communities, no matter how large or small, no matter what their ethnic complexion. “This is essentially a People’s contest,” explained Abraham...

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2. “With More Freedom and Independence Than the Yankees”: The Germans of Richmond, Charleston, and New Orleans during the American Civil War

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pp. 57-97

Due to an extremely difficult source situation, a monographic discussion of the position of Germans or German Americans in the Confederacy is still the largest and most serious research gap in the field of American studies of the Civil War era.1 ...

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3. “Ye Sons of Green Erin Assemble”: Northern Irish American Catholics and the Union War Effort, 1861–1865

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pp. 99-132

Surrounded by rain-soaked roads and the brisk chill of a Minnesota March, Christopher Byrne struggled to understand the events whirling about him. It was early spring in 1863, a date that marked his tenth year in America and his six-month anniversary with the U.S. Army. ...

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4. Irish Rebels, Southern Rebels: The Irish Confederates

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pp. 133-155

At Hibernian Hall in Charleston, South Carolina, in late 1877, former congressional candidate Michael Patrick (M. P.) O’Connor was master of ceremonies of an event to raise money for a new monument “to the Irish Volunteers.” The Volunteers had served in the Confederate army...

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5. The Jewish Confederates

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pp. 157-186

In March 1865, Samuel Yates Levy, a captain in the Confederate army and a prisoner of war at Johnson’s Island, wrote his father, J. C. Levy of Savannah, “I long to breathe the free air of Dixie.” Like the Levy family, Southern Jews were an integral part of the Confederate States of...

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6. Native Americans in the Civil War: Three Experiences

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pp. 187-212

In 1861, when news of the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter swept the country, Native Americans could have had few illusions about being on the winning side. They had been on the losing side in all the white men’s wars. In the Seven Years’ (or French and Indian) War, the...

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7. The African American Struggle for Citizenship Rights in the Northern United States during the Civil War

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pp. 213-236

Between the Revolution and the Civil War, successive generations of Americans debated the meaning of citizenship. The vocabulary drew upon the legacy of the Revolution and similar struggles for national independence and republican government in the Atlantic world during the...

About the Contributors

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p. 237

Index

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pp. 239-240