Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Note on Romanization and Translation

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pp. ix-x

The Hanyu Pinyin system is used in this book for words in Chinese. Some names in Hong Kong Chinese differ from those in Taiwan where the first name is followed by last name then the middle name. For names without an Anglo first name, the last name is followed by the Chinese names...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xi-xiv

This book is a point of confluence. It is as if I have come full circle. My deepest gratitude goes to the informants for sharing their stories and providing invaluable support for this project. I take responsibility for any shortcomings in this book. This project first grew out of my doctoral research at Hong Kong Polytechnic University...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

There is an urgency to understanding the city of Hong Kong through its spaces. A city with a population of 7 million living on only 25 percent of its developed land, the portrayal of Hong Kong as a geographic token of urban density has prompted many studies.1 It can be perceived as a global fascination with how one city has managed to cope with limited...

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1. Living Spaces

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pp. 23-40

One of my first interviews takes place on a bunk bed. Twenty-year-old Bik Bik sits across from me at the lower level of the bunk while I sit on her flatmate’s bed. Personal belongings are on the bed with clothing hanging over the railings and a laptop at the end of the mattress. With less than two feet across from each bed, we start our two-hour interview...

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2. Consumption Spaces

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pp. 41-64

Lesbian spaces as sites of resistance have been studied in the last decade with social geographer Gill Valentine urging geographers and urban sociologists to map lesbian neighbourhoods “from nowhere to everywhere” (Valentine 2000, 1). Notions of resistance have taken on multiple meanings...

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3. Regulatory Spaces

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pp. 65-88

Certain spaces are often identified as of a predominantly regulatory and surveillance nature. Named commonly among informants, these everyday spaces include religious institutions, schools and workplaces. Interviewees have also developed coping strategies to handle crises...

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4. Political Spaces

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pp. 89-112

I came to understand Hong Kong tongzhi politics as a dual process of g/localization and regionalization of sexual rights, by this I mean a continuous translation and repositioning of sexualities from global influences, Chinese regional information flows and localized meanings...

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5. Cultural Spaces

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pp. 113-126

A discussion of queer spaces often leads to further questions such as what counts as a queer space, how do they emerge and who has access to them?1 The emergence of queer spaces in the last decade can be traced back to a number of incidents that occurred in Hong Kong in the post-1997 era...

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Epilogue

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pp. 127-140

It is very rare for a film to resonate with me as much as Yau Ching’s Ho Yuk: Let’s Love Hong Kong, so much so that it called for a slightly different response.3 A counter script perhaps, to encounter the imaginary lesbian bodies, voices and desires on screen. Or are they imaginary? Chan Kwok Chan (Wong Chung Ching), Zero (Erica Lam) and Nicole (Colette Koo),...

Notes

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pp. 141-152

Profile of Informants

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pp. 153-158

Methodological Notes

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pp. 159-170

Interview Guide

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pp. 171-176

Bibliography

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pp. 177-190

Index

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pp. 191-194