Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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p. ix

Introduction

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pp. 1-6

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Chapter One

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pp. 7-37

On the evening of July 29, 1835, Charleston, South Carolina’s postmaster, Alfred Huger, dutifully opened mail sacks delivered direct from New York City on the steamship Columbia. Once every two weeks the Columbia made the run between New York and Charleston, and for...

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Chapter Two

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pp. 39-69

In 1840 Francis Wayland visited Paris and was not impressed. He wrote to a friend that France was a nation bowed down “in form to the Romish Ceremonial,” yet without “a God in the world.” “If France is a Christian nation,” he continued, “what are we, then, to say of the millions and hundreds of millions...

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Chapter Three

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pp. 71-88

In the two decades prior to the Civil War, northern evangelicals found a domestic complement to the threat of Catholic Europe in the slave system of the American South. It has been well documented that evangelicals played a significant role in the antislavery fervor that swept through...

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Chapter Four

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pp. 89-112

That the northern evangelical press incessantly portrayed Catholicism and slavery as irreconcilable with democracy had little to do with the reality of either Catholicism or slavery in the American South. Southern Catholics retained the political commitments of their region, and this alone indicted them by evangelical...

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Chapter Five

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pp. 113-145

As northern and southern Protestant denominations slowly divided over slavery, the American Catholic hierarchy worked hard to keep the Church out of sectional conflict. Throughout the antebellum period, differences in ethnicity and cultural habits severely separated many Catholic communities...

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Epilogue

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pp. 147-152

Nineteenth-century Americans were the first modern westerners to live in the absence of an established church. Religious nonestablishment proved a remarkable inheritance for evangelicals. Evangelicalism, which at one time flourished outside of religious establishments, slowly became a kind...

Notes

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pp. 153-187

Index

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pp. 189-200