In this Book

summary

Healing lies at the heart of Zen in the home, as Paula Arai discovered in her pioneering research on the ritual lives of Zen Buddhist laywomen. She reveals a vital stream of religious practice that flourishes outside the bounds of formal institutions through sacred rites that women develop and transmit to one another. Everyday objects and common materials are used in inventive ways. For example, polishing cloths, vivified by prayer and mantra recitation, become potent tools. The creation of beauty through the arts of tea ceremony, calligraphy, poetry, and flower arrangement become rites of healing.

Bringing Zen Home brings a fresh perspective to Zen scholarship by uncovering a previously unrecognized but nonetheless vibrant strand of lay practice. The creativity of domestic Zen is evident in the ritual activities that women fashion, weaving tradition and innovation, to gain a sense of wholeness and balance in the midst of illness, loss, and anguish. Their rituals include chanting, ingesting elixirs and consecrated substances, and contemplative approaches that elevate cleaning, cooking, child-rearing, and caring for the sick and dying into spiritual disciplines. Creating beauty is central to domestic Zen and figures prominently in Arai’s analyses. She also discovers a novel application of the concept of Buddha nature as the women honor deceased loved ones as “personal Buddhas.”

One of the hallmarks of the study is its longitudinal nature, spanning fourteen years of fieldwork. Arai developed a “second-person,” or relational, approach to ethnographic research prompted by recent trends in psychobiology. This allowed her to cultivate relationships of trust and mutual vulnerability over many years to inquire into not only the practices but also their ongoing and changing roles. The women in her study entrusted her with their life stories, personal reflections, and religious insights, yielding an ethnography rich in descriptive and narrative detail as well as nuanced explorations of the experiential dimensions and effects of rituals.

In Bringing Zen Home, the first study of the ritual lives of Zen laywomen, Arai applies a cutting-edge ethnographic method to reveal a thriving domain of religious practice. Her work represents an important contribution on a number of fronts—to Zen studies, ritual studies, scholarship on women and religion, and the cross-cultural study of healing.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Frontmatter
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Foreword, by Nara Komyo Yasuaki
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xii
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Prologue
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 1: Mapping the Terrain
  2. pp. 1-28
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 2: The Way of Healing Yudo 癒道
  2. pp. 29-64
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 3: Personal Buddhas Living with Loss and Grief
  2. pp. 65-107
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 4: Domestic Zen Living Esoteric Wisdom
  2. pp. 108-166
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 5: The Healing Power of Beauty
  2. pp. 167-203
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Chapter 6: Revealing the Healing Realm of Zen
  2. pp. 204-216
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 217-240
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Kanji Glossary
  2. pp. 241-244
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography of Sources Cited
  2. pp. 245-254
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 255-262
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780824860134
Related ISBN
9780824835354
MARC Record
OCLC
794700714
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.