Contents

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p. vii

List of illustrations

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pp. ix-x

Note on Supplemental Material

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pp. xi-xii

Preface

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pp. xiii-xiv

Acknowledgments

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p. xv

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-10

The selection and utilization of subsistence resources filters through most aspects of prehistoric lifeways, influencing how archaeologists perceive and interpret the archaeological record. human/environment relationships can even be understood by detecting evidence of the plants and animals people...

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2. Interactions Between People and Plants

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pp. 11-39

One main focus of this work is to gain a greater understanding of prehistoric plant exploitation strategies in the middle Atlantic and greater eastern Woodlands. This chapter examines the ethnohistoric, ethnobotanical, and archaeological literature regarding plant use in the middle Atlantic region and beyond. These accounts describe the various types of locally available...

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3. The Biology and Archaeology of Starch Grain Research

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pp. 40-61

Many of the plants presented in Chapter 2 produce and use starch as their primary form of carbohydrate energy reserve. This chapter explores the biology of starch, emphasizing those aspects that make it valuable in archaeobotanical studies. in order to appropriately utilize this methodology, however, researchers must be familiar with...

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4. Approaches to and Outcomes of Plant Processing

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pp. 62-79

The physiochemical composition of a plant can influence how people interact with it, as many taxa require processing in order to render them edible, palatable, or culturally acceptable. relationships between people and plants, therefore, transcend mere selection as culture often...

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5. Starch Grain Studies in the Delaware River Watershed and Beyond

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pp. 81-112

The information presented within the previous chapters serves as the foundation upon which the remainder of this exploration into Delaware River Watershed (DRW) prehistoric people and plant interactions is built. in order to augment the archaeobotanical, ethnohistoric, and ethnobotanical data depicted earlier, artifacts...

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6. Woodland Period Plant Use in the Delaware River Watershed

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pp. 113-131

Data presented previously in this book are used in this chapter to interpret aspects of Woodland period prehistoric plant use and human/environment interactions in the Delaware river Watershed (DRW) and surrounding areas. The starch grain findings presented in Chapter 5 are evaluated here in conjunction with the macrobotanical, phytolith, and ethnohistoric accounts...

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7. The Environment of Paleoethnobotany

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pp. 132-137

Over the past several decades researchers have significantly advanced our archaeological understanding of prehistoric lifeways in eastern north America. one of the most important developments has been the refinement and acceleration in the application of archaeobotany. numerous journal articles, edited volumes, and books that fill the stacks of university libraries bear...

References Cited

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pp. 139-184

Index

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pp. 185-195