In this Book

Living as Equals
summary
Using interviews with leaders and participants, as well as historical archives, the author documents three interracial sites where white Americans put themselves into unprecedented relationships with African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans. In teen summer camps in the New York City and Los Angeles areas, students from largely segregated schools worked and played together; in Washington, DC, families fought blockbusting and white flight to build an integrated neighborhood; and in San Antonio, white community activists joined in coalition with Mexican American groups to advocate for power in a city government monopolized by Anglos. Women often took the lead in organizations that were upsetting patterns of men's protective authority at the same time as white people's racial dominance.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Table of Contents
  2. p. vii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. ix
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-24
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  1. Chapter 1. Camping for Democracy
  2. pp. 25-57
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  1. Chapter 2. Respecting All the Brothers and Sisters
  2. pp. 58-92
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  1. Chapter 3. Making a Neighborhood
  2. pp. 93-136
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  1. Chapter 4. Abiding Together
  2. pp. 137-169
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  1. Chapter 5. The Limits of White Anglo Benevolence
  2. pp. 170-203
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  1. Chapter 6. A Victory of Multicultural Collaboration
  2. pp. 204-236
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 237-246
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 247-290
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 291-299
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