Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

Research support for this book was provided by many sources, including postdoctoral fellowships from the Monticello College Foundation at the Newberry Library and an Ahmanson-Getty Post-doctoral Fellowship from UCLA’s William Andrews Clark Memorial Library and the Center for Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Studies. Wayne State University gave me several research leaves, which allowed me to finish the book. Numerous grants from the university’s general research ...

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

The Lives of Women: A New History of Inquisitional Spain begins with the most basic of questions. What did it mean to be a woman in Spain’s early modern period? Part I, “Defining Gender: The Inquisition,” examines two Inquisition cases that share a fundamental concern with the definitions of gender and....

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

In the late sixteenth century, Spanish inquisitors asked Mar

Part I. Defining Gender

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-10

read more

1. “I am a man and a woman”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-31

In 1605, do

read more

2. Bernarda Manuel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-54

On a November day in 1650, a thirty-four-year-old woman was taken to an Inquisition chamber, where, to avoid torture, she declared her innocence and informed her jailers that she had “the curse of women”—her...

Part II. Imagining Gender

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-56

read more

3. Women in Fiction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-73

The trial records of Elenora de C

read more

4. Women Onstage

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-90

In an age in which probably less than one-quarter of the population could read, reactions to writers like María de Zayas and Mariana de Carvajal would have come primarily from people who heard texts read aloud to them. Nonetheless, the authors’ principal...

Part III. Women’s Worlds

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-92

read more

5. Nuns as Writers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-117

The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries saw significant change in women’s literary activity on the Iberian Peninsula. We have seen that the public book market provided a space for a few privileged, talented women, such as Ana...

read more

6. Nuns as Mothers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 118-144

We who live in the secular world often imagine life in convents as mysterious and far removed from everyday experience. It often is easier to imagine the lives of people like Elenora de C

Part IV. Women’s Networks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 145-146

read more

7. Single Women

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 147-168

While early modern culture legitimized the roles of nun, wife, and mother, some women neither entered the convent nor married. Others became single through separation or abandonment. These phenomena created two categories...

read more

8. Toward a History of Women’s Education

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 169-186

The endeavor of recovering women’s textual history necessarily involves an investigation of literacy and education. To date, no research synthesizes the roles women played in the educational sphere, yet we know that they advised...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-192

Perhaps because some consider Spain slightly backward—a poor stepchild to the rest of western Europe—people often express incredulity when they discover that Spanish women wrote in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Did women in....

Glossary

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-194

Brief Biographies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-200

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-238

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-256

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-266