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The Game Changed
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Praise for Lawrence Joseph:



"Poetry of great dignity, grace, and unrelenting persuasiveness… Joseph gives us new hope for the resourcefulness of humanity, and of poetry."
---John Ashbery



"Like Henry Adams, Joseph seems to be writing ahead of actual events, and that makes him one of the scariest writers I know."
---David Kirby, The New York Times Book Review



"The most important lawyer-poet of our era."
---David Skeel, Legal Affairs
 
 
 A volume in the Poets on Poetry series, which collects critical works by contemporary poets, gathering together the articles, interviews, and book reviews by which they have articulated the poetics of a new generation.



Essays on poetry by the most important poet-lawyer of our era



The Game Changed: Essays and Other Prose presents works by prominent poet and lawyer Lawrence Joseph that focus on poetry and poetics, and on what it is to be a poet. Joseph takes the reader through the aesthetics of modernism and postmodernism, a lineage that includes Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, and Gertrude Stein, switching critical tracks to major European poets like Eugenio Montale and Hans Magnus Enzensberger, and back to American masters like James Schuyler and Adrienne Rich.



Always discerning, especially on issues of identity, form, and the pressures of history and politics, Joseph places his own poetry within its critical contexts, presenting narratives of his life in Detroit, where he grew up, and in Manhattan, where he has lived for 30 years. These pieces also portray Joseph’s Lebanese, Syrian, and Catholic heritages, and his life as a lawyer, distinguished law professor, and legal scholar.

Table of Contents

  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Poets on Poets and Poetry
  2. pp. 1-2
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  1. The Poet and the Lawyer: The Example of Wallace Stevens
  2. pp. 3-9
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  1. Michael Schmidt’s Lives of the Poets
  2. pp. 10-17
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  1. A Note on “That’s All”
  2. pp. 18-20
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  1. Tony Harrison and Michael Hofmann
  2. pp. 21-25
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  1. Frederick Seidel
  2. pp. 26-32
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  1. Enzensberger’s Kiosk
  2. pp. 33-41
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  1. “Our Lives Are Here”: Notes from a Journal, Detroit, 1975
  2. pp. 42-49
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  1. John Ashbery and Adrienne Rich
  2. pp. 50-56
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  1. Poets on Poets and Poetry
  2. pp. 57-58
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  1. James Schuyler’s The Morning of the Poem
  2. pp. 59-67
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  1. Word Made Flesh
  2. pp. 68-77
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  1. A Few Reflections on Poetry and Language
  2. pp. 78-88
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  1. Hayden Carruth
  2. pp. 89-94
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  1. Marilyn Hacker
  2. pp. 95-98
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  1. Aspects of Weldon Kees
  2. pp. 99-103
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  1. Smokey Robinson’s High Tenor Voice
  2. pp. 104-105
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  1. Joyce Carol Oates’s Blonde
  2. pp. 106-112
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  1. Poets on Poets and Poetry
  2. pp. 113-114
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  1. Marie Ponsot
  2. pp. 115-119
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  1. Conversation with Charles Bernstein
  2. pp. 120-128
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  1. Working Rules for Lawyerland
  2. pp. 129-132
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  1. The Game Changed
  2. pp. 133-139
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  1. Being in the Language of Poetry, Being in the Language of Law
  2. pp. 140-161
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