Contents

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p. ix

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

The European Union is quietly emerging as a significant security actor. It is perhaps a little-known fact that the EU has thousands of troops deployed around the world under its blue-and-gold-starred flag. In the past decade, it has engaged in 24 civilian and military operations in unstable and conflict-ridden regions.1 Member states altogether spend nearly...

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1. Why Do Epistemic Communities Matter?

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pp. 13-41

A rich debate within EU studies focuses speci‹cally on explaining integration and the nature of EU power. Scholars come at the question from many different angles, drawing on a variety of policy areas to craft nuanced arguments. But most agree that the social context of Europe has been an important variable in explaining nearly all aspects of integration since the...

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2. Toward European Security Integration

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pp. 42-76

Security integration involves much more than counterterrorism, but in many ways, 9/11 and the subsequent 2004 and 2005 attacks in Madrid and London served as critical junctures in the intensi‹cation of integration in this area. How did these events affect EU security policy? One argument is that “the reframing of terrorism as a transnational, networked phenomenon...

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3. Diplomats and Internal Security

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pp. 77-121

Professional diplomats are an essential feature of the Brussels landscape. A casual look at the daily news in Brussels reveals that behind nearly every major EU action are EU diplomats. Ambassadorial-level diplomats in particular are increasingly recognized as the main drivers behind the EU’s daily functioning, from foreign affairs to internal arrest warrants to divorce...

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4. Diplomats and External Security

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pp. 122-144

The Political and Security Committee (PSC, also known by its French acronym, COPS) is an appropriate comparison to Coreper, as it is another key grouping of ambassadors influencing security outcomes.1 It is also a valuable comparison because while Coreper is a strong example of an epistemic community of diplomats, PSC is weaker in comparison, demonstrating...

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5. The Military Community

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pp. 145-185

In the context of EU security integration, the military representatives (milreps) of the European Union Military Committee (EUMC) lie at the core of a wider epistemic community that extends below them in the military hierarchy, above them in the capitals, around them in their national and EU-level defense staff offices, and horizontally to their counterparts in...

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6. Loose and Nascent Communities

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pp. 186-213

Within the EU borders, a number of epistemic communities are not quite as established, cohesive, or prominent as those discussed thus far. While they may often appear weak, they are not necessarily failed actors. Some may be loose epistemic communities in which members come from a variety of professions and have different types of expertise. For example,...

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Conclusion

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pp. 214-227

There is no question that the security of a state’s borders, infrastructure, and people is as fundamental to sovereignty as a state’s “monopoly of legitimate physical violence.”1 Nevertheless, this study reveals an unexpected phenomenon: knowledge-based networks are redefining the meaning of sovereignty and security in Europe. These networks are creating an...

Notes

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pp. 229-250

Bibliography

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pp. 251-264

Index

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pp. 265-281