Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Frontmatter

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. v

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-xiv

if ever a single body symbolized English masculinity in the popular imagination, it was, and to some extent continues to be, the large and brutish figure of John Bull, famously created by Dr. John Arbuthnot in 1712 and circulated widely in popular print from the eighteenth century through the present day. In his book-length study of English national character, Peter...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

this book would not have been possible without the unflagging support of two very important Jacquelines: Jacqueline Foertsch, my strongest advocate and most valued colleague at the University of North Texas (UNT), and Jacqueline Ettinger, my brilliant editor at the University of Washington Press. The invaluable comments and critiques from series editor Richard...

read more

1. A Visual Prehistory

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-30

in a metaphorical flourish in Thomas Paine’s revolutionary treatise Rights of Man (1791), the author describes aristocrats as dwarfs, claiming that “[t]he artificial noble shrinks into a dwarf before the noble of nature,” a rhetorical strategy intended to underscore the “natural” superiority of common men.1 Interestingly, this is not Paine’s sole use of dwarf imagery...

read more

2. The Dwarfing of Little-Man Pope

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-55

at the same time that dwarfs were moving from the courts to the public sphere, a similar transformation was taking place for writers who, by the 1700s, no longer depended on aristocratic or royal patronage but were free to earn a living selling their works by subscription or directly to the newly abundant array of London booksellers—or so the popular version...

read more

3. The Little Man–Microscope in Brobdingnag

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-79

after the publication of Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels in 1726, the notion of the little man no longer necessarily conjured up images of old and new kinds of real and metaphorical dwarfs in the imaginations of the expanding male and female English reading public. Given the enormous success of Swift’s book and its widely available imitations and offshoots,...

read more

4. The Labor of Little Men

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-104

in 1730, Henry Fielding wrote a series of love poems addressed to “Celia,” otherwise known as Charlotte Cradock, whom he married in 1734.1 In one of these poems, “To the Same. On Her Wishing to Have a Lilliputian to Play With,” the author muses: “May I, to please my lovely dame, / Be five...

read more

5. The Little Man of Feeling

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-122

in 1750, a poem titled “The Author Apologizes to a Lady, for His Being a Little Man” appeared in The Student, under the name “Mr. Lun,” a pseudonym for the poet Christopher Smart. The poem’s self-mocking characterization was typical of Smart’s references to his own small physical stature,...

read more

6. Josef Boruwl Aski’s Memoirs of the Celebrated Dwarf

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-136

the year 1788 saw the publication of the last significant little-man text of the century, Memoirs of the Celebrated Dwarf, the autobiographical account of Josef Boruwlaski, a Polish court dwarf. Boruwlaski emigrated to England to earn a living for himself and his family after creating a scandal in Poland and offending his royal mistress, the Countess Humieska,...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 137-159

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-171

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-183