In this Book

Origins and Diversity of Axial Age Civilizations, The
summary
This book presents a new and original analysis of the great ancient civilizations, focusing on the breakthroughs and their institutionalization in Greece, Israel, China, and India. The conditions under which these civilizations developed are systematically explored. For comparative purposes, the civilization of Assyria, where such a breakthrough did not take place is analyzed.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Contributors
  2. p. ix
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xiii
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  1. Introduction: The Axial Age Breakthroughs-Their Characteristics and Origins
  2. pp. 1-25
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  1. Part I. The Origins of the Axial Age in Ancient Greece
  2. p. 27
  1. Introduction: The Axial Age Breakthrough in Ancient Greece
  2. pp. 29-39
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  1. I. The Emergence of Second-order Thinking in Classical Greece
  2. pp. 40-64
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  1. 2. The Emergence of an Autonomous Intelligence among the Greeks
  2. pp. 65-91
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  1. 3. Dynamics of the Greek Breakthrough: The Dialogue between Philosophy and Religion
  2. pp. 92-110
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  1. 4. The Meaning of the Word cr&~a. (Body) in the Axial Age: An Interpretation of Plato's Cratylus 400C
  2. pp. 111-124
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  1. Part II. The Origins of the Axial Age in Ancient Israel with a Comparative Look at Assyria
  2. p. 125
  1. Introduction: The Axial Age Breakthrough in Ancient Israel
  2. pp. 127-134
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  1. 5. Myth and Reality in Ancient Israel
  2. pp. 135-168
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  1. 6. The Protest against Imperialism in Ancient Israelite Prophecy
  2. pp. 169-182
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  1. 7. On Self-Consciousness in Mesopotamia
  2. pp. 183-202
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  1. 8. Monarchy and the Elite in Assyria and Babylonia: The Question of Royal Accountability
  2. pp. 203-224
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  1. PART III. The Secondary Breakthroughs in Late Antiquity--Second Temple Judaism and Christianity
  2. p. 225
  1. Introduction: The Secondary Breakthrough in Ancient Israelite Civilization--The Second Commonwealth and Christianity
  2. pp. 227-240
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  1. 9. Eschatology, Remythologization, and Cosmic Aporia
  2. pp. 241-251
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  1. 10. Old Wine and New Bottles: On Patristic Soteriology and Rabbinic Judaism
  2. pp. 252-260
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  1. 11. The Role of Christianity in the Depolitization of the Roman Empire
  2. pp. 261-279
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  1. 12. Architects of Competing Transcendental Visions in Late Antiquity
  2. pp. 280-287
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  1. PART IV. The Origins of the Axial Age in China and India
  2. p. 289
  1. Introduction: The Axial Age Breakthrough in China and India
  2. pp. 291-305
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  1. 13. Historical Conditions of the Emergence and Crystallization of the Confucian System
  2. pp. 306-324
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  1. 14. Was There a Transcendental Breakthrough in China?
  2. pp. 325-359
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  1. 15. The Structure and Function of the Confucian Intellectual in Ancient China
  2. pp. 360-373
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  1. 16. The Historical Background of India's Axial Age
  2. pp. 374-392
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  1. 17. Ritual, Revelation, and Axial Age
  2. pp. 393-406
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  1. 18. Asvatthaman and Brhannada: Brahmin and Kingly Paradigms in the Sanskrit Epic
  2. pp. 407-426
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  1. 19. Some Observations on the Place of Intellectuals in Max Weber's Sociology, with Special Reference to Hinduism
  2. pp. 427-452
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  1. 20. The Reflexive and Institutional Achievements of Early Buddhism
  2. pp. 453-471
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  1. PART V. Islam
  2. p. 473
  1. Introductory Remarks: Islam
  2. p. 475
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  1. 21. The Emergence of Islamic Civilisation
  2. pp. 476-483
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 485-556
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