Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Photographs

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p. vii

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Series Foreword

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pp. ix-x

In the field of oral history, Kentucky is a national leader. Over the past several decades, thousands of its citizens have been interviewed. The Kentucky Remembered series brings into print the most important of those collections, with each volume focusing on a particular subject. ...

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xiv

After World War II, European Jews faced the daunting challenge of rebuilding their lives. In rare cases, entire families were lucky enough to survive the Holocaust, but in no cases did communities survive. The question of where to make a home...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

We would like to thank some of the key people who have guided this project since its inception in 1998 as a series of oral history interviews, since each step of that process ultimately made the creation of this book possible. During the interviewing phase of the project, Joan Ringelheim, then of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, offered dependably ...

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Introduction: Listening to Kentucky's Holocaust Survivors

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pp. 1-18

On a hot May night in 2005, hundreds of people crowded into the former Fayette County courtroom in Lexington, Kentucky, to hear six people speak. The Lexington History Museum, which now occupies the former courthouse, had never before hosted a crowd of this size. The air conditioner was defunct, and the...

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A Note on Methodology

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pp. 19-21

When I began to search in 1998 for Holocaust survivors in Kentucky, I relied on several sources, primary among them the Benjamin and Vladka Meed Registry of Jewish Holocaust Survivors at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Through the registry, the Louisville Jewish Community Center, and word of mouth, I identified seventy potential interviewees; of these, I was able to make contact ...

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Chapter 1. Sylvia Green

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pp. 23-41

Sylvia Green (née Sylvia Färber) was born in Karlsruhe am Rhein, Germany, in 1924. Sylvia, as she pointed out to me, never had a teenage life, the years of the war having coincided almost exactly with her adolescence. When I met her in 1996, she had recently passed some of the milestones that are significant for many American...

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Chapter 2. Oscar Haber

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pp. 43-59

I first visited Oscar and Fryda Haber in their Lexington home in May of 2000. On that day, I interviewed each of them, beginning with Fryda, who spoke carefully and graciously, yet somewhat reluctantly. Oscar, by contrast, was impulsive and eager to speak. Two weeks later, he and I continued our interview, and after five hours of taping, we had still barely begun to scratch the ...

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Chapter 3. Robert Holczer

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pp. 61-80

Robert Holczer was born in Budapest, Hungary, in 1929. Soon after the German invasion of Hungary in March of 1944, the country's Jews began to be deported to Nazi camps. Robert and his mother ultimately managed to avoid deportation by moving into an apartment building that served, during siege of Budapest, as a clinic for wounded Hungarian Arrow ...

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Chapter 4. Abram Jakubowicz

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pp. 81-96

Abe Jakubowicz lives in a well-kept ranch-style house on the outskirts of Louisville with his wife, Frieda. At the time of this interview, in 1999, Abe still helped to manage his family's five 20/20 Eye Care stores in central Kentucky, although at age seventy-five he had begun to pass the reins to his children. Abe was ...

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Chapter 5. Ann Klein

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pp. 97-111

This interview was conducted in Ann Klein's Louisville home in July of 1999. Ann was the youngest of three children, born in Eger, Hungary, in 1921. Her father was a prominent banker in the town, and her mother was the president of a Jewish charity organization. In March of 1944, Germany invaded Hungary. By May, ...

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Chapter 6. Justine Lerner

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pp. 113-127

Justine Lerner was born in Bialystok, Poland, in 1923, one of eight children in a close-knit family. Justine was the only member of her family who survived the Holocaust. This interview took place on May 5, 1999, in Justine...

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Chapter 7. Alexander Rosenberg

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pp. 129-147

Alexander Rosenberg lives with his wife, Alice, in a handsome house on a quiet cul-de-sac in Louisville. He is an avid gardener of both flowers and vegetables-- when I visited in June of 2000, I was treated to a tour of his well-kept garden beds. Our interview was punctuated by the chiming of his wall-clock, which features a different birdsong each hour. ...

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Chapter 8. John Rosenberg

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pp. 149-170

This interview, which spanned three days in 1999 and 2000, was conducted in John Rosenberg's Prestonsburg office. By then, John had lived and worked in the Eastern Kentucky town for thirty years. As the director of the Appalachian Research and Defense Fund--also known as ...

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Chapter 9. Paul Schlisser

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pp. 171-192

Paul Schlisser lives in a subdivision near Fort Knox, outside of Louisville. When I visited in June of 2000, Paul's patriotism was in evidence throughout his home, from the flagpole in his front yard to the photographs of himself in uniform on the walls. Paul is a man of perfect posture and authoritative...

Notes

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pp. 193-200

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 201-204

Index

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pp. 205-215