Front cover

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Copyright

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Like all historians, i owe a large debt of gratitude to the numerous teachers, scholars, archivists, colleagues, and research institutions that contributed to the writing of this book. Many along the way helped me produce a final product that is far superior to there that i first became intrigued by the religious dimensions of ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-12

On the evening of July 30, 1907, a spirit of revelry swept over the evangelical Christians of Atlanta, Georgia. Hundreds celebrated around the statue of Henry Grady, the famed post–Civil War booster of economic development in the New South. Lula Ansley, a leader of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) in Georgia, later recalled ...

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1. "Distilled Damnation": Temperance before 1880

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pp. 13-36

Heman Humphrey personified the early phase of the movement to eradicate drunkenness in America. In 1813 the Congregational minister penned what was likely the first temperance tract in the United States, inaugurating a new genre of religious publication that would stream off printing presses for the next century....

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2. "It Is Not Enough That the Church Should Be Sober": Drying Up the South, 1880–1915

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pp. 37-78

“The gloom which had so long been on the affairs of the denomination was now rapidly giving way, and brighter prospects were everywhere evident,” wrote B. F. Riley, reflecting on the atmosphere of the early 1880s.1 The Alabama Baptist leader recognized that as the post–Civil War malaise began to fade in the South, evangelicals became increasingly optimistic...

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3. "Why Don't He Give His Attention to Saving Sinners?" Prohibition and Politics

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pp. 79-121

The evolution of southern evangelical prohibitionists from moral suasionists to political activists met with serious resistance from both without and within evangelical circles. Several other issues became deeply intertwined with prohibition after 1880, especially during the politically turbulent 1890s. Southern evangelicals’ increasingly strong prohibition stance placed them on a collision course with a revered principle: the doctrine ...

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4. "But What Seek Those Dark Ballots?" Prohibition and Race

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pp. 123-173

In addition to overcoming the political obstacles facing their cause, southern evangelical prohibitionists found it necessary to accommodate their campaign to the peculiarities of southern culture. One of the most persistent and pernicious problems in the South’s history has been that of race relations, and the southern prohibition movement coincided with ...

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5. "Let the Cowards Vote as They Will, I'm for Prohibition Still": Prohibition and the Southern Cult of Honor

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pp. 175-198

When Edward Ward Carmack left his office at the Nashville Tennessean on the afternoon of November 9, 1908, he was only moments away from changing the course of the Tennessee prohibition movement and Tennessee politics in general. Unfortunately, he was also only moments away from his death. Carmack had been at the helm of Nashville’s ...

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6. "Some of Our Best Preachers Part Their Hair in the Middle": Prohibition and Gender

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pp. 199-229

Women played a central role in the way that southern evangelicals made their case for prohibition in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Women were viewed as the most vulnerable victims of intemperance and as the key justification for prohibitory legislation. The idea that white women were endangered by alcohol underpinned most evangelical arguments for prohibition. From the drunkard’s wife ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 231-237

Prohibition, like most reform initiatives of the Progressive Era, did not originate in the South. Both Ted Ownby and Dewey Grantham have argued that few reforms can be called “distinctively southern.”1 Nevertheless, it seems clear that in some ways prohibition is an exception to this ...

Notes

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pp. 239-301

Bibliography

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pp. 303-321

Index

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pp. 323-329