Abstract

This essay examines the ways that W. S. Van Dyke's island romance, White Shadows in the South Seas (1928), reveals the imprint of both desire and anxiety at the heart of American representations of the South Pacific. The film also highlights the transitional and contradictory nature of American cultural, racial, and sexual discourses of the 1920s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 98-121
Launched on MUSE
2002-05-01
Open Access
No
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