Abstract

Abstract:

Whether lexical representations are stored as abstract forms or exemplar tokens is the focus of much debate in both the phonological and word-recognition literature. This research report examines the recognition of words that have undergone Canadian raising and/or intervocalic flapping. Two eye-tracking experiments suggest that listeners are slower to fixate words that have undergone one or more phonological processes within their own raising dialect, supporting the idea that they must calculate a mapping from surface word forms to more abstract representations. Implications for representational and phonological theories are discussed.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-0665
Print ISSN
0097-8507
Pages
pp. e136-e160
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-15
Open Access
No
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