Abstract

Abstract:

Languages have several grammatical means of expressing the relation between speaker and addressee, including speech-style particles, politeness pronouns, allocutive marking, and honorifics. Despite the similarity in the meaning they convey, these politeness markers fall into two distributional classes: some (‘content-oriented markers of politeness’) can occur in complement clauses, while others (‘utterance-oriented markers of politeness’) are restricted to matrix contexts. Focusing on speech-style markers in Korean and second-person pronouns in Romance languages (especially Italian), we develop a dynamic pragmatics model of the distinct kind of meaning that they encode and provide an analysis that accounts for their distributional differences.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-0665
Print ISSN
0097-8507
Pages
pp. 1-36
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-15
Open Access
No
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