Abstract

Abstract:

This article argues that C. S. Lewis’s status as a children’s book author, as well as the reception of his Narnia books, should be considered anew in light of the history of children’s books in the early and mid-twentieth century. I suggest that the roots of The Chronicles of Narnia lay in part in Lewis’s reactions to a perceived neglect of the children’s book genre by the literary elite and that differences in the transatlantic reception of these books may be mapped onto the historical particularities of children’s books and their gatekeepers in the decades around the series’ publication

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 27-43
Launched on MUSE
2019-03-02
Open Access
No
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