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  • Biographies

Jens Bjering holds a PhD from the Department of Arts and Cultural Studies at the University of Copenhagen, and is now postdoctoral fellow at the Department for the Study of Culture at the University of Southern Denmark where he is part of research project on the aesthetics of late modern war. His work mostly focuses on the intersection between legal philosophy, Continental theory, and cultural analysis, and he is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively titled Working the Dark Side—on the United States Torture Regime after 9/11. Jens can be reached at jensbjering@gmail.com

K. Daniel Cho teaches at Otterbein University. He works on psychoanalysis in a variety of disciplinary contexts. Daniel's email address is dcho@otterbein.edu

William E. Connolly is the Krieger-Eisenhower Professor at Johns Hopkins University where he teaches political theory. His most recent books include Aspirational Fascism: The Struggle for Multifaceted Democracy Under Trumpism (2017); Facing the Planetary: Entangled Humanism and the Politics of Swarming (2017); and The Fragility of Things: Self-Organizing Processes, Neoliberal Fantasies, and Democratic Activism (2013). He is currently finishing a book to be entitled Climate Machines, Fascist Drives, & Truth. William's email address is pluma@jhu.edu

Oliver Davis is Co-Director of the Centre for Research in Philosophy, Literature and the Arts at Warwick University, UK. He is the author of Jacques Rancière (Polity, 2010) and the editor of Rancière Now (Polity, 2013), among other works. Oliver's email address is O.Davis@warwick.ac.uk

Kathy E. Ferguson is professor of political science and women's studies at the University of Hawai'i. She is currently writing a book on the role of letterpress printers in the anarchist movement and another book on women's participation in anarchism from the Paris Commune to the Spanish Revolution. Kathy can be reached at kferguso@hawaii.edu

Steven Johnston is Neal A. Maxwell Presidential Chair in Political Theory, Public Policy, and Public Service in the Department of Political Science at the University of Utah. He is the author of Wonder and Cruelty: Ontological War in "It's a Wonderful Life" (Lexington Books, Politics, Literature & Film series, forthcoming, 2019), Lincoln: The Ambiguous Icon (Rowman & Littlefield, Modernity and Political Thought series, 2018), American Dionysia: Violence, Tragedy, and Democratic Politics (Cambridge, 2015), The Truth about Patriotism (Duke, 2007) and Encountering Tragedy: Rousseau and the Project of Democratic Order (Cornell, 1999). Steven's email address is steven.johnston@utah.edu

Donald V. Kingsbury lectures in the Department of Political Science and the Latin American Studies Program at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Only the People can Save the People: Constituent Power, Revolution, and Counter-Revolution in Venezuela (SUNY Press, 2018) as well as articles on Energy Transitions, alternatives to development, and contemporary Latin American politics and thought. His work can be read in the Latin American Research Review, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Radical Philosophy Review, New Political Science, and Historical Materialism. Donald can be reached at donald.kings-bury@utoronto.ca

Matthew MacLellan is an Adjunct Professor of Political Studies, Cultural Studies, and Philosophy at Mount Saint Vincent University, Nova Scotia, Canada. He has published numerous articles on contemporary political and cultural theory, and is the translator of Pierre Dardot and Christian Laval's Common: On Revolution in the Twenty-First Century (London: Bloomsbury, 2019). Matthew's email address is Matt.MacLellan2@msvu.ca

Ivan Manokha is a Departmental Lecturer in International Political Economy at the Oxford Department of International Development. In his research, he has investigated the relationship between global capitalism and individual rights, and more recently has started working on the implications of new technologies of surveillance for different individual rights. His recent publications have focused on self-censorship and self-discipline in the context of surveillance, and the transformations in workplace surveillance with the rise of new employee monitoring technologies. Ivan can be reached at ivan.manokha@qeh.ox.ac.uk

John Protevi is Phyllis M Taylor Professor of French Studies and Professor of Philosophy at Louisiana State University (Baton Rouge LA, USA). He is the author of Life, War, Earth (Minnesota, 2013) and Political Affect (Minnesota, 2009), and...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1092-311X
Print ISSN
2572-6633
Pages
pp. 999-1001
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-26
Open Access
No
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