Abstract

Abstract:

This article argues for a revision of conceptual and historical mappings of the American road film through a rereading of Herk Harvey’s cult classic Carnival of Souls (1962) and the era’s slew of highway safety productions, related literature, and institutional practice. It suggests that the genre of the road film began with a trio of movies in the early 1960s, including Psycho (1960) and The Haunting (1963), as well as Harvey’s film, which exposed and dramatized historical anxieties about the “dangers” of women appropriating the freedoms and pleasures of the open road connected to car culture.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 24-46
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-12
Open Access
No
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