Abstract

Abstract:

Arabic was formally added to the Harvard curriculum in 1654, but the language had a robust presence in New England prior to midcentury. Arabic was deeply embedded in all aspects of English society in the seventeenth century, and first-generation immigrants brought their interest in and knowledge of Arabic to New England. Unlike England, where Arabic was used in the service of science, diplomacy, trade, and theology, the study of Arabic in New England remained within a theological framework from the seventeenth century until the first half of the twentieth century, when American economic interests in the Middle East freed the study of the language from its theological constraints.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-147X
Print ISSN
0012-8163
Pages
pp. 851-876
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-11
Open Access
No
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