Abstract

Abstract:

The play Furu Amerika ni sode wa nurasaji (1970) is a fictionalized and unconventional interpretation of the suicide of a historical figure named Kiyū, a yūjo of the Yokohama pleasure quarters in the bakumatsu period (1853–69). Ariyoshi Sawako's fictionalized and romanticized story about Kiyū, who dies for love, markedly contrasts with the historical figure, a brave woman who killed herself as an act of opposition to foreign influence. This article discusses how Ariyoshi's fiction reinvigorates and interrogates the image of Kiyū, thereby shifting the audience's attention from Kiyū's alleged patriotism to the sad reality of her life and exploitation as a yūjo.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1549-4721
Print ISSN
0095-6848
Pages
pp. 333-360
Launched on MUSE
2018-07-31
Open Access
No
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