Abstract

Abstract:

Scholars have long tried to explain why Union general George McClellan's campaign to capture Richmond, Virginia, in the summer of 1862 failed. With the exception of some limited attention to weather and terrain, Civil War historians have essentially ignored the complex natural world in which McClellan made his critical decisions. Employing methodology from both environmental and military history provides new insights into the actions of both Union and Confederate armies. The environment McClellan encountered brought out the worst in the general, magnifying the personal traits and quirks that led to some of his most baffling command decisions. Simultaneously, Confederate forces used nature to their advantage, employing strategies that allowed their armies to stave off a potentially devastating conquest of Richmond.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2159-9807
Print ISSN
2154-4727
Pages
pp. 388-415
Launched on MUSE
2018-08-20
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.