Abstract

Abstract:

Recovering Wallace Thurman as a disabled author gives literary critics the advantage of fresh interpretive inroads to his creative work. In this essay, Thurman's 1929 novel The Blacker the Berry is reread in light of his disability. The novel is found to celebrate bodily diversity and to challenge the ableism of certain of Thurman's Harlem Renaissance contemporaries.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1925-5683
Print ISSN
0027-1276
Pages
pp. 107-122
Launched on MUSE
2018-06-05
Open Access
No
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