Abstract

Abstract:

After covering the trial of Adolf Eichmann, which ended in 1962, Hannah Arendt turned increasingly to the life of the mind, man in the singular rather than the men in their plurality she'd long insisted upon. To understand how we might avoid future evil by developing our capacities for thinking and judgment, Arendt drew on Socrates's idea of the individual as "two-in-one." Here, I use Flannery O'Connor's story "Revelation" to illustrate Arendt's conception of two-in-one. Finally, I consider how another O'Connor story, "The Displaced Person," challenges the reader to become "two in one" herself.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 165-184
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-19
Open Access
No
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