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  • Contributors

Terry A. Barnhart is professor of history at Eastern Illinois University, where he teaches courses in public history and social and cultural history. Prior to coming to Eastern Illinois in 1994, he was a curator for eleven years at the Ohio Historical Society, now the Ohio History Connection.

Christopher Cumo is an independent scholar and author. He has a PhD in history from the University of Akron.

Renea Frey is assistant professor of English and Writing Program director at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. She studies the rhetorical effects and conditions of parrhesia, a type of free speech where the speaker takes a great risk to resist or criticize power, as well as contemplative pedagogies, collaborative writing, and women's nineteenth-century composing practices.

Jacqueline Johnson is the university archivist at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. Her research focuses on the history of Miami University, Western College for Women, and Oxford College.

Arjun Sabharwal joined the University of Toledo Library faculty in January 2009 as digital initiatives librarian responsible for the digital preservation of archival collections, managing Toldeo's Attic Virtual Museum—a website dedicated to the local history of northwest Ohio—and the University of Toledo Digital Repository. He is currently associate professor of library administration with current research interests in both traditional and digital history, humanities, curation, archives, and developing virtual exhibitions.

Robert Llewellyn Tyler has researched Welsh communities across the United States and has been published in numerous journals. He is presently employed by Kean University at its Wenzhou-Kean campus in China. [End Page 4]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-6042
Print ISSN
0030-0934
Pages
p. 4
Launched on MUSE
2018-02-03
Open Access
No
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