Abstract

Abstract:

This study considers how the Shakespeare Ladies Club and supporters like George Lillo responded to the commercial pressures of the professional stage through their role in the Shakespeare revival of the 1730s. With a focus on how Lillo's Marina (1738) rewrites and expands Pericles' brothel scenes in order to generate audience sympathy for its title character, it argues that adapters, theater managers, critics, and players alike grappled with the mercenary foundations of performance by developing a working theory of ethical spectatorship in which theatrical pleasures could be bought and sold freely without undermining the growing cultural investment in Shakespeare's texts.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 163-178
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-06
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.