Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines how the experience of Japanese American migration shaped the ways in which women were instrumentalized by the Japanese empire for its expansion in South America and Northeast Asia. The anti-Japanese sentiment and campaigns in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the early twentieth century greatly impacted the Japanese government's approach to managing women's role in Japan's migration-driven expansion in Brazil and Manchuria during the following decades.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8050
Print ISSN
1045-6007
Pages
pp. 437-467
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-05
Open Access
No
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